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AVL_Sprinter
04-30-2008, 12:38 PM
I have read the post on this and have been researching Dynamat.

Instead of spending insane amounts of money of this stuff, could you put normal house insulation behind the panels in the van to help with the same thing? Or does that cause problems that I am not aware of?

And for those that have used the Dynamat, is it worth it and what are the advantages of using it instead of insulation?

Thanks in advance.

OrioN
04-30-2008, 03:49 PM
What do you consider 'normal' house insulation?

cedarsanctum
04-30-2008, 04:17 PM
Avoid using things like fiberglass insulation. The vibrations and movement of the van will break the fibers down into 'fiberglass dust' that you'll be breathing in. :2cents:

maxextz
04-30-2008, 04:22 PM
hi
ive been looking at sound deadning also ive seen a large roll of soft rubber thats sticky on reverse side its for under wood flooring it has sound deadning properites and only costs 65 euros for about 16x4.5 ft, i am sure it will do the job, i also experamented with soft kitchen lino glued on front door of sprinter and even that has made a difference,"door closes with a nice heavy thud" instead of sounding like a tin box,im going for the roll of soft rubber and radiator foil on top for entire van:thumbup:, cost about 100 euros :laughing:
max...

maxextz
04-30-2008, 04:29 PM
Avoid using things like fiberglass insulation. The vibrations and movement of the van will break the fibers down into 'fiberglass dust' that you'll be breathing in. :2cents: thats a good tip never thought of movement causing it to break up,:idunno:,i think people that use it put it in plastic bags then insert in behind panels.
max....

ccutshaw
04-30-2008, 06:26 PM
They use fiberglass insulation in RV's all the time. I installed it in my van a year ago and have heard stories of it causing rusting from trapped moisture. :idunno:
I don't know if spray on insulation would be better. Seems to me spray in insulation would close up all the drain holes in the doors and walls. Insulation does make a big difference when trying to cool the van in 100 weather.
Calvin

ccutshaw
04-30-2008, 06:44 PM
Look at what this guy does.
http://www.dogshowvans.com/spr-pictures-thumb.htm
Scroll down to the bottom of the page. I would hate to have to go into the door to fix a broken wire on the door lock or electric window defrost.
Calvin

AzteK
04-30-2008, 11:55 PM
How much does the expanding foam insulation cost? And does it stick to plain metal, or does it need some sort of cure first for it to adhere properly?

cedarsanctum
05-01-2008, 02:38 AM
Check out this thread; http://sprinter-source.com/forum/showpost.php?p=24715&postcount=15

I did the full insulation with reflectix and soft foam rubber, sandwiching the foam between the reflectix to provide separation from the metal. This works great and deadens the sound a lot. Not sure about the insulation value yet, haven't camped in the cold yet, but the heat gain is less.

My thoughts :professor: about insulating, with foam or anything else, for keeping heat in it's place; the metal body of the van acts like a conductor for the heat. You'd have to build a completely separate box inside the van to really insulate it well. Filling it with foam is OK, but it's not the same as building a house, there's a LOT of metal to conduct heat in or out.
Most important thing is to keep some air moving around the metal, even a tiny bit, so moisture won't collect and cause rust and or mold to start building up. If it's sealed tight with foam, and moisture finds it's way into any of the bare metal inside (these bodies aren't dipped, there are spots inside with very little paint that you cannot see very easily) it will eventually cause a problem.
And that's my :2cents:

p.s. The fiberglass that comes free from the batts is pretty much microscopic and can't be seen except as a fine powdery dust that blends in with the usual road dust. Looking at it in a microscope will show how nasty it can be inside your lungs, kinda like asbestos.

pvsprinter
05-01-2008, 03:22 AM
I,ve gone two routes on sound damping.One was to use a closed cell foam similar to wet suit material but I think it may have been polyurathane (5/16") glued on with a 3M spray adhesive.The other was a butyl rubber mat similar to Dynamat (1/16" self sticking with release paper and a foil back so you can roll it down to give a good bond). What I used is called Sound Destroyer;Google it
about $100 shipped for 100 sq. ft. in 18" width. You can also layer it to give better damping.
I then used Reflectix? foil faced bubble wrap as thermal insulation in both cases.
In spite of the foam/bubble layer giving more thermal insulation with sound damping I think the mat/bubble layer is a better bet because I feel more confident that the mat will stay stuck to the metal skin. I may have some delamination of the foam now. More thermal insulation can be had by multiple layers of the Reflectix.
The sliding door done with the mat gives a solid thump when rapped rather than the normal steel drum dong.I did the front floor under the floor mats and as much of the passanger side fire wall easily reached and it made a noticable differance in engine noise. I plan to get more mat and do the front doors as well as as much of the firewall as I possibly can (dash removal yech but there also seems to be air leaks through the firewall so maybe I can plug those to).

Bob

BBlessing
05-01-2008, 03:29 AM
i am planning to insulate the roof of my ncv3 like the dog vans. but i am going to use 1/4 inch baltic birch. on the ceiling, i don't see any issue with using this sort of insulation, but in the doors? thats where i would use the dynamat. its lookin like it will cost me about 250 usd for the two part polyeurathane foam and applicator. :cry: anyone have a good line on that insulation? i will post pics when it is done.

bb

ccutshaw
05-01-2008, 01:44 PM
Google spray foam insulation kits.

This has been a good thread I need to rethink my insulation. I have b-quiet (similar to dynamat) in the walls and ceiling as a starter.
:hmmm: What to do next?
Calvin

Nhuskys
05-01-2008, 02:05 PM
Anyone have any experience with this setup?
http://www.sprinteraccessories.com/047_insulation_kit.html

OrioN
05-01-2008, 03:20 PM
If you use spray foam, you will have more sound insulation than any 'Dynamat' product or other form of insulation (Sound or thermal), plus as a bonus you will have the highest thermal R-Value possible. Dynamat is good for what it does (I won't elaborate, do a google on how & why it performs), but doesn't do all. Glass insulation will rot your vehicle and trap mold if you live in a humid area, plus has very little effect on sound reduction.

BBlessing
05-01-2008, 03:53 PM
Anyone have any experience with this setup?
http://www.sprinteraccessories.com/047_insulation_kit.html

these guys gave me the idea to google search for adhesive backed foam insulation. check these guys out.

http://www.insulation4less.com/prodex_Ffmf.asp

the smallest roll will do the roof twice!

bb

ccutshaw
05-01-2008, 07:12 PM
bblessing, Did you see this quote off there web site?


"Reflective insulation is the most effective when incorporated with at least ¾ inch airspace between the insulation and any adjacent material. The R value of the system will vary dependent on the airspace size and the direction of the heat flow, and the conductive and convective properties of surrounding materials."


Every situation will be a little different no one setup will work for all. I have windows on the side cargo and rear doors. There is a lot of metal that is conductive to the outside. A reflective coating on the roof would help a lot in my case. :thinking:
Calvin

BBlessing
05-02-2008, 01:24 AM
i haven't really had much time to really check it out. maybe the spray foam is still the best way to go? unless i stick it to the baltic birch i plan to install up there. that would create a 1 1/2 inch air gap. hmmm...

bb

Datajockeys
05-15-2008, 05:44 AM
Has anyone tried this: :professor:
http://www.fosterproducts.com/default.aspx?PageID=product_list&cat_id=154&sub_cat_id=155

We used to use this stuff fin the Navy to insulate and seal duct work. I recommend the fiberglass reinforced stuff. It also works in the wheel wells and undercarriage for sound deadening as well. It is fire resistant, abrasion resistant, waterproof, flexible and is relatively cheap.

I plan to replace the fiberglass wool I put in with this and the reflective bubble stuff. Should be a lethal combination. Smear on mastic with hands, layer with reflective bubble-wrap, smear on more mastic to protect it... wella!

mean_in_green
05-15-2008, 06:11 AM
It might be waterproof in its own right, but I'd research that one more to learn how it deals with moisture.

If it simply holds moisture within the wool, you may find it rots your panels through quicker than sea salt.

Simon

Datajockeys
05-15-2008, 01:18 PM
It might be waterproof in its own right, but I'd research that one more to learn how it deals with moisture.

If it simply holds moisture within the wool, you may find it rots your panels through quicker than sea salt.

Simon

I am replacing the wool with Mastic and reflective bubbles.

ccutshaw
05-15-2008, 01:43 PM
Earlier in this thread someone said they used foam rubber. I tried stuffing a piece of foam in my garage door to measure temperatures of the inside of the door with the sun on it. What a big difference it made.

Something like this might work.

http://texasgarages.com/insulation.htm

Calvin

GreenSprinter
05-16-2008, 02:46 PM
I am also looking for thermal insulation and an architect friend suggested the prodex using FRP sheets as the backing material.

lzcamper
05-16-2008, 11:14 PM
I have a Sprinter passenger van that I'm converting to a camper. The roof was insulated by fastening Prodex with double-sided tape to the back of the roof panels rather than the roof. The roof panels are thick in some places, so the gaps between the outside sheet metal and the roof panels vary from 1.5" to 0.5". Fiberglass batting was stuffed on the sides of the roof where the gaps are much larger. JM fiberglass batting was used. It is enclosed in plastic with a vapor barrier on one side. The cut ends of the batts are covered with plastic bags from the supermarket. Up until reading the responses about the use of fiberglass as van insulation, I planned to do the side panels in the same manner, but may reconsider its use. If I change, I'll just tape another layer of Prodex on the inside of the roof and just leave an air gap in between. For sound dampening, linoleum patches might work. I don't think that you need to cover an entire area to dampen the sound. I did a trial run by sticking a small patch (peal & stick) on the inside of the roof and it seemed to dampen the noise, but the adhesive melted in the hot sun. If I try again, it will be glued with a strong heat resistant adhesive.

Don't some van conversion companies use fiberglass insulation? I think I know of one major one that does.

Rick

guisar
05-17-2008, 12:36 AM
I just finished doing door weatherstripping and insulation- I don't have an SPL meter so I can't quantify the result but my wife, who pays little attention to things automotive other than to point out weird sounds, noted without knowing I'd done anything that the van seems much quieter and asked if did replaced the muffler or something.

For weather stripping I used 5 strips of Type 2 from here: http://www.jcwhitney.com/autoparts/Product/tf-Browse/s-10101/Pr-p_Product.CATENTRY_ID:2008661/p-2008661/N-111+10201+600003813/c-10101

and 2 strips of type M from here:
http://www.jcwhitney.com/autoparts/Product/tf-Browse/s-10101/Pr-p_Product.CATENTRY_ID:2008603/p-2008603/N-111+10201+600003813/c-10101

The Type 2 stripping I put around the perimeter of the sliding door and the front parts of the front doors. The Type M I put along the vertical rear part of the front doors.

I added 1 - 2 layers of peel and seal to the exterior panels followed by one layers of .25" closed cell foam attached with 3M spray adhesive to the peel and seal. I got the EVA foam from here:
http://www.foamorder.com/closedcell.html. I'm not sure which has the better acoustic properties- EVA or Volara.

Finallly, the hollow parts of the body panels without opening windows with low-expansion spray foam. I've read where people have been able to use plastic piping or something similar to get foam up into the borders around the windows- my attempt just resulted in mess (thank goodness for gloves and protective plastic sheets). All the weather stripping was applied so that there's an even, flush seal along the exterior perimeter of the door.

In addition to whatever sound benefits there are the doors now close with authority and a hefty feeling "bang". The "hiss" that used to accompany passing cars is entirely gone. Oddly the area that I notice the most is the B pillar which I filled with foam at the bottom. There direct rush of air and noise from outside which you could hear from the shoulder seat belt adjustment area which is gone entirely. The outside of the car (to me anyway) looks much nicer around the doors as there's a flush black rubber seal instead of big gaps.

I've attached a few pics- I can send more or better ones if these are unclear.

unik
05-17-2008, 01:10 AM
I have read the post on this and have been researching Dynamat.

Instead of spending insane amounts of money of this stuff, could you put normal house insulation behind the panels in the van to help with the same thing? Or does that cause problems that I am not aware of?

And for those that have used the Dynamat, is it worth it and what are the advantages of using it instead of insulation?

Thanks in advance.

Yes I made it:bash:
First I glued 1/4" star foam. Then on a rest space below "windows"
I put house insulation and cover with play wood. On a play wood glued carpet

Hikinginpdx
10-21-2009, 05:32 PM
I’ve been through Cascade Audio’s site (referenced here in the forum) and looked at the Sprinter write-up referenced by the audio site.

A few things have bothered me regarding all of the data I’ve come across.

Items like Dynamat are good to apply to panels which have structural issues. The thin sides of our vans are great examples of this. The sites selling these materials want us to cover the entire interior surface of everything with this stuff. Several of the audio sites I’ve found indicate that just covering the entire surface is overkill. Their take is that you need to apply enough to strengthen the panel and give it mass. Then move to the next step and work on sound barriers instead of adding more dampening.

I called Cascade Audio and we asked what their preferred solution would be for dealing with the lessening noise and adding thermal protection. First item addressed was the floor and in his opinion the greatest source of noise entering the Sprinter. I’ve already got ½ rubber mat in the cargo area, which has made a huge difference. His suggestion was to do the rear wheel wells with a dampening product and complete all areas of the floor (a.k.a cockpit floor) and as much of the firewall as I can get access. His product VB-4 seems to be similar to Dynamat and others. This all sounds like an excellent plan and fits with all of my other research.

As for the walls and ceilings, his take was dampening has been adequately done at the factory, move on to a barrier. His suggestion is a 1” Acoustic Cotton barrier and nothing else. The material has a foil backing which would face the inside. This material would drop ambient noise 17DB and give me the thermal protection. Still an expensive option. The barrier alone would run about $1000. I also don’t have any idea what level of thermal properties I would be adding. He said it would work well, but no numbers to support, just you will stay warm with this stuff. With many of the Sprinters cavities running close to 2” I’m also left with almost 1” of vacant space in the wall cavity which seems like something I should fill.
Jute is not considered a good insulator, is the Acoustic Cotton similar in its qualities? If so I’m not sold on this as a solution.

With the barrier costing $1000, it’s higher than the single spray foam bid I received at $700 installed. I’ve not found any numbers regarding closed cell spray foam as a sound barrier. At 1” would it exceed the 17db drop that this barrier is claiming? If so, I will be able to go 2” in many areas which should be even better.

Does anyone have experience using acoustic barriers?

With all my research my conclusions are coming down to these:
1) Cover the floor as described, go nuts with the damping on wheel wells, cockpit floor and firewall.
2) Upgrade the hood damping. Apparently that noise translates straight to the windshield and into the Sprinter.
3) Walls and ceiling on NCV3’s are dampened enough. Spend my money elsewhere.
4) Go for the mid and high frequency deadening in the walls and ceiling. I’m not sold on the cotton acoustic barrier and I’m still feeling the love for closed cell insulation of some type. Leaning towards a full foam job or foil backed panels for the large surfaces and self applied foam in the small areas. I think the thermal qualities are going to be significantly better ( my assumption only as I don’t have quantified data to support either way). What I need to figure out is what the DB drop would be compared to what the ‘audio experts’ are suggesting.
5) Cover the walls with a solid panel which will buffer the thermal conductance of the Sprinters metal wall supports. Thinking 1/8” mahogany for this.
6) Cover the panel with auto grade carpet which will deal with reflected surface noise.

If you have gone this route, are you happy with the result? Any thing you would have changed after living with it for awhile?

Keith

OrioN
10-21-2009, 05:53 PM
Does anyone have experience using acoustic barriers?


Keith


I installed a sliding door bulkhead and insulated that for thermal and mass. Now there is no noise from the rear(road or dishes rattling) and ac/heat work more efficiently.

FYI: All other walls have factory deadening and urethane spray foam.

Hikinginpdx
10-21-2009, 09:02 PM
Interestingly enough, I heard back from ‘Second Skin’ and their approach differs from the prior input from another highly respected expect company.

Their thoughts are that more damping are need, this contradicts the previous expect. They feel that using the liquid version would be the way to go, however, they would like to see a significant buildup of material then a barrier layer. There barrier layer suggestion is for a 3/8” laminated foil acoustic mat. From the information I see on their website, it appears to be more focused on blocking major heat sources from encroaching on the van interior. Mats about $500 and then the 10 gallons at about $800.

“5 gallons of Spectrum will do 100 sq feet very well, so obviously for 200 sq feet you will need 10 gallons.
This will get you a 2 mm coating over the enire surface area which is an outstanding way to handle it.

Once the Spectrum is cured, I would go over the top of it with our Heat Wave product.
This is a very inexpensive thermal barrier that will handle both heat, and unwanted noise.
It is light weight and will do an outstanding job for your application.

More food for thought,

Thanks for the feedback OrioN. Seems I happen to be wandering down the same path you did several years ago when you built up your Sprinter… First electrical, now insulation.

Keith

maxextz
10-21-2009, 09:53 PM
well done Keith:clapping: great write up and very informative, i didnt know about the sound traveling up through the windscreen from the hood.

i have insulated my cab roof/floor and doors, in the cargo area i have done the walls but need to do the roof and floor"under the wood" which will make a big difference even walking on it its noisey.:rolleyes:

but i wont be using that stuff you are talking about because its crazy money and i like to find other ways sometimes unconventional but functional and costs a lot less.:thumbup:

max.......:popcorn:

Hikinginpdx
10-21-2009, 11:39 PM
Max, I totally agree about the crazy money part. Also, thanks for the props!

My goal is to do the job right with the least amount of $$$ out.

For me 'right' means that I can hear the music I want to hear. A bit of a music buff / snob at home. Plus I don't like the fatigue that road noise brings.

Additionally, I don't want materials that are going to break down or become ineffective with the daily condensation that comes to a vehicle. Even last night I could see the droplets on the ceiling while visiting with a friend.

If I can figure out how the people with really money to blow do it, I’ll figure out a way to closely match their end product. Well that’s the goal, and so far, I’m doing pretty well on the project parts. ICrossed fingers now that I say that as I’m waiting to hear if my welder is still onboard to work next week.

What I got out of the (2) experts is that additional deadening in the walls and ceiling, may or may not be the beneficial. OK, that was useful.

Right now, I’m committed to not putting a dynamat type material on the entire surface of the cargo area. I'm not feeling the return is worthwhile. Rear wheel wells and the cab floor / firewall will get something. I’ve looked into cheap supplements. One is a ‘Snow roof’ type of product. It appears that this is essentially the same material as the liquid dyna whatevers that the experts are touting. Potential issue is that ‘Snow Roof’ has an additional weather proofing agent which smells horrid and is mildly toxic in confined areas during application.

Rumor is that it will off gas the agent within a couple of days. My concern of this and other products is , am I goanna see this whenever the Sprinter gets hot? Will it really off gas completely in just a couple of days? Lucky for me, a co-worker has a half box of a dynamat left over from his car project years ago. That should get me through the cockpit floor or fire wall. The info I’ve gotten so far, tells me I really don’t need to deal with anything more than that for damping. Therefore, I’d be out only the cost of one additional box at the high end. Guessing in the $100 - $200 range to complete dampening. If you have another proven solution, I’m all ears.

All things so far point to sound barriers as the place I want to be putting my effort. Although I’m not excited to put cotton material in a wall that will be constantly damp. Maybe on the inside of foam fill or above the cockpit headliner could add value. If I can get a rocking deal on a full foam job (target price of $500 in my dreams), I’m all in. I’m going to wait till I’m ready to go and have cash in hand late November. Deals may be had. Even heard of 1 person here getting it done for $250. Folklore or a myth, don't know. If that doesn’t work, I have to make the call, spring for the $700ish full foam or do closed cell sheets.

Home Depot has nice foil backed sheets. R5 or R7 @ 1” and about $25 for a 4x8 sheet. Then that will cover the ceiling and fill in the window panels that that will not be filled with glass. I’ll then use cans of the flex closed cell stuff that Home Depot sells to fill joints and all hard to reach areas. I’ll then top it off with foil tape at the seals. Concerns I have with the panels is I don’t want them squeaking in time as the Sprinter flexes.

Stuff I’m committed to stay away from:

* Pink fiberglass – sucks when wet
* Paper backed anything
* Single cans of foam for the entire box, I know people do this, but gezzz what a lot of work.
*Tar based products. I believe they will continue to off gas throughout its life and I'm not into stink.
*The foil only barriers – All say they need air flow on 1 side to be effective
*Open cell anything
*Pasting dollar bills against the walls for thermal insulation!


Lise's take is, she wants to know the difference in cost between quiet and as quite as you can make it. If only a few $100s, then go all out. Above all, just keep me warm.


Keith

maxextz
10-22-2009, 12:13 AM
great stuff this will be interesting:popcorn: best of luck:thumbup:

ps i love this.........*Pasting dollar bills against the walls for thermal insulation!


Lise's take is, she wants to know the difference in cost between quiet and as quite as you can make it. If only a few $100s, then go all out. Above all, just keep me warm.

:lol:

max.............:smirk:

glasseye
10-22-2009, 12:26 AM
Cascade Audio told me in a phone conversation that the floor was critical. You need to decouple the flooring material from the steel body with whatever you can. The pathetic attempt that MB used (some kind of fiberous material) is far too thin. He suggested closed cell foam. Those interlocking panels you see for playrooms that look like a jigsaw puzzle make good sense to me.

They re-iterated what others have said - that the wheel wells and cockpit floor and firewall were good targets, too. I hear a lot of white noise from my B-pillar, so it's a good candidate for some weatherstripping.

teamtexas
10-22-2009, 12:43 AM
I've almost finished installing a Grace product I bought from Lowes. I've been very happy with the results so far. Doing the whole van for about $120.

Dan

You can see the write up here http://sprinter-source.com/forum/showthread.php?t=7704&page=4

Hikinginpdx
10-22-2009, 01:11 AM
Cascade Audio told me in a phone conversation that the floor was critical.

Exactly what I heard from them also.

I didn't pull the floor up and replace the material, just went over the top and it made a huge difference. The floor is really quite, although the wheel wells and rear door are horid. Tonight I'm going to start on the wheel wells.

66859

I'm wondering about the B-Pillar noise, what frequencies are coming out of there? Is the weather stripping just to seal the edges of the plastic pillar cover? Now I have to see if the pillars are hollow...

Baby steps, every little bit seems to help

Hikinginpdx
10-22-2009, 01:14 AM
I've almost finished installing a Grace product I bought from Lowes. I've been very happy with the results so far. Doing the whole van for about $120.

Dan

You can see the write up here http://sprinter-source.com/forum/showthread.php?t=7704&page=4

Dan,

It looks like the Grace product is intended to dampen. Did you have a chance to see what effects the damping had prior to insulating on top of it?

How is the off-gassing of that product?

teamtexas
10-22-2009, 02:07 AM
I've not completed the roof yet, I have two sections open waiting for a rooftop ac and a fan. But the van is alot quieter already. I have also started to install the R-mat insulation in the roof, walls and doors. There is a slight smell from the product but I feel it won't be noticable after the wall coverings are done. :2cents:

Dan

OrioN
10-22-2009, 04:04 AM
Exactly what I heard from them also.

I didn't pull the floor up and replace the material, just went over the top and it made a huge difference. The floor is really quite, although the wheel wells and rear door are horid. Tonight I'm going to start on the wheel wells.

66859

I'm wondering about the B-Pillar noise, what frequencies are coming out of there? Is the weather stripping just to seal the edges of the plastic pillar cover? Now I have to see if the pillars are hollow...

Baby steps, every little bit seems to help

In my van the worst offenders for road noise affecting the stereo sound that can and is fixed is 1) B-Pillar and 2) floor and boot in driver seat base. Both are now insulated with thermal insulation (UltraTouch Natural Cotton Fiber) from http://www.bondedlogic.com/ultratouch-cotton.htm and available any where.

My buddy is a A/V technition and we used a meter to test noise levels in various areas. Those 2 areas had increased the noise by a minimum of 35db at drive speed above 45mph before insulation and 0db after. Don't bother using sound dampening in the rear van walls and ceiling if you go the spray foam route, it will be a complete waste of $$$ as you will not get much if any less db reduction, at least from where you sit. You must do the wheel well, mine are boxed in so, they have minimum 3" and up to 6" insulation. As foor floor, I will spray foam the chassis and add a layer of protective coating on top(bottom?) as soon as I install my tanks. Most 5th wheels have this done. No point in lifting and raising floor, when you can do it from below and get 60-80% coverage of R28 thermal and more sound insulation....

elysium
10-22-2009, 08:16 PM
As foor floor, I will spray foam the chassis and add a layer of protective on top as soon as I install my tanks. Most 5th wheels have this done. No point in lifting and raising floor, when you can do it from below and get 60-80% coverage of R28 thermal and more sound insulation....

Wow. May be it's just me, but definitely post pictures when you are done (or even as you do it). I'd be quite interested in seeing how this turns out.

jmgasior
10-23-2009, 12:06 AM
thanks to everyone on their different approaches to the noise and insulation problem.still trying to figure how to do mine,money is tight after buying the van,keep the ideas flowing.great bunch of people.

brucetheparishiltonfan
10-30-2009, 02:44 AM
Once again I'm blown away by this site. So much information!

First, a dumb question. If I take the wall panels off, how difficult is it to put them back up? Can you reuse the little fasteners? I assume you just pull them off with like a claw hammer. Do they break? Can you get new ones?

My basic approach is to spend as little money as possible, and do as little work as possible. That said, I've read alot about how important the floor is. Wouldn't a layer (or 2) of carpet on the floor achieve good results?

My 2002 has a few signs of rust, so I want to get that repaired before doing much else. I'm liking the spray on foam. I figure that after I repair any rust in the walls I'll hit it with some primer, then foam, then replace the wall panels. Or would it be a good idea to hit the walls with some of that waxy undercoating material first?

My wall panels aren't in real good shape, but I'll just cover them with outdoor carpet. I can get some free. I'll fill all the pillars with foam. Before doing the ceiling I'll spray it with primer. With a fresh coat of primer on the sheet metal, and foam on top of it, it seems like it should stay rust free.

Hikinginpdx
10-30-2009, 02:56 AM
Bruce,

I wouldn't use a claw hammer to pry them off. For about $5 Harbor Freight has a body trim tool set. With these you can lift the fastern heads and remove just about any trim peice without marking them. Also extreamly good tools for pulling back weatherstriping while reattaching things like pillar covers.

For your $5 you get about 6 differently shaped tools that will save you tons of time and keep you from damaging the surfaces.

Keith

brucetheparishiltonfan
10-31-2009, 12:09 AM
Bruce,

I wouldn't use a claw hammer to pry them off. For about $5 Harbor Freight has a body trim tool set.
Keith

I found their site, and here's the body trim tools:
http://search.harborfreight.com/cpisearch/web/search.do?keyword=body+trim+tool&Submit=Go

Would the "Installer Pry Tool Kit 95532-0VGA" be a good choice? Love that price, $4.99!

Thanks

Mrdi
10-31-2009, 01:55 AM
Installer pry is the one
I purchased a set at the recommendation on another post.
Works well.

Hikinginpdx
10-31-2009, 02:25 AM
This is the one I bought, best $5 I've spent in awhile. They are just blue plastic, but pretty strong. I got these when I was putting a new head unit in. I've had it out a couple of time, actually coming out in 2 weeks again to rewire with an alternate power source, A and B pillars have been off too with these and not a mark left.

Installer Pry Tool Kit

95532-0VGA

$4.99


Enjoy, glad I could help.

Keith

vondiesel
10-31-2009, 11:39 AM
This is what I used it works great http://www.industrialinsulation.com/armaflex_sheet_roll.htm

Altered Sprinter
10-31-2009, 12:50 PM
This is what I used it works great http://www.industrialinsulation.com/armaflex_sheet_roll.htm
Seems like your to use what I have done but in 25 mil thickness 95% heat resistant But expensive
pair_coil_specs.pdf (application/pdf Object) (http://www.formshield.com.au/pair_coil_specs.pdf)
18277
Richard

geochris
05-10-2010, 05:19 AM
Anyone have any experience with this setup?
http://www.sprinteraccessories.com/047_insulation_kit.html

I just tried to order an insulation kit and was told it was not available. Looks promising though?

We just finished installing B-Quiet Ultimate (second time we've used it). Significant difference, as good as and in some cases better than Dynamat but a bunch less expensive.

Jcc52sprinter
10-12-2011, 10:27 PM
Has anyone used dynamat in the kick (foot) area near gas/brake pedals? My sprinter does not have any insulation there. I imagine it would reduce engine noise.

Oldfartt
10-13-2011, 12:09 AM
Bruce,

To remove the panel studs on the internal walls, rotate the centre piece 90 degrees with a flat bladed screwdriver and pull it out. Mostly the two pieces should come out with a direct pull. If you inspect the removed fastener you will see the little tabs on the centre pin which allow proper extraction. They can be reused, just re-aline the pin and push the stud back into the hole.
I have just completed the exercise of removing all the side panels.

Cheers

Ross

bg101
02-20-2012, 06:42 PM
I,ve gone two routes on sound damping.One was to use a closed cell foam similar to wet suit material but I think it may have been polyurathane (5/16") glued on with a 3M spray adhesive.The other was a butyl rubber mat similar to Dynamat (1/16" self sticking with release paper and a foil back so you can roll it down to give a good bond). What I used is called Sound Destroyer;Google it
about $100 shipped for 100 sq. ft. in 18" width. You can also layer it to give better damping.
I then used Reflectix? foil faced bubble wrap as thermal insulation in both cases.
In spite of the foam/bubble layer giving more thermal insulation with sound damping I think the mat/bubble layer is a better bet because I feel more confident that the mat will stay stuck to the metal skin. I may have some delamination of the foam now. More thermal insulation can be had by multiple layers of the Reflectix.
The sliding door done with the mat gives a solid thump when rapped rather than the normal steel drum dong.I did the front floor under the floor mats and as much of the passanger side fire wall easily reached and it made a noticable differance in engine noise. I plan to get more mat and do the front doors as well as as much of the firewall as I possibly can (dash removal yech but there also seems to be air leaks through the firewall so maybe I can plug those to).

Bob

DO NOT USE SOUND DESTROYER!
SEE LINK http://www.theimportkiller.com/forums/index.php?topic=829.0