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kenj356
01-13-2014, 02:59 PM
I just bought a 2005 MB Cruiser with 84,000 miles on it and it has some rust between the weather seal and the body at the bottom of the windshield. I was told by a body shop that services Fedex that this is common on these vans and that they have never repaired one without breaking the windshield when it is removed. Has anybody got any experience with this rust repair? I plan to keep the RV for a long time and I want to get this problem addressed before it gets worse. Thanks.

mean_in_green
01-13-2014, 03:05 PM
Can you store the vehicle inside for a few days? The nuisance part of this for most people is arranging to have the 'screen worked on twice, rather than the typical wham-bam one hour replacement.

The body shop is right - both the T1N and the NCV3s rust there. My four year old NCV3 with just 130,000 miles just had a replacement ' screen - it already has the beginnings of corrosion around the aperture. Not much you can do apart as the seal is the cause, it rubs against the paint...

Aqua Puttana
01-13-2014, 03:36 PM
The windscreen (OK Simon? :thumbup:) is bedded and sealed by the adhesive. On my 2004 I carefully slit and removed the "look pretty" rubber edge which was trapping and holding moisture. The lower part of my windscreen is hidden by the hood anyway so I don't worry about the looks. That slowed the rusting process, not halted it though.

This coming summer I plan to scrape the rust, prime, top coat and then apply a bead of polyurethane like I did on the top section already.

http://sprinter-source.com/forum/showthread.php?p=208720#post208720

I've considered gluing an EDPM roof membrane "skirt" to the glass to shed water down over the lower seal. At this time I'm on the fence about implementing that because the water may find its way in anyway. vic

kenj356
01-13-2014, 06:34 PM
Thanks for the quick responses and the link to the technical write-up on this problem. I plan to visit a few repair shops tomorrow to get some estimates. My approach will be to have the windshield removed, the rust damaged metal repaired or replaced with POR applied to the edge all around the windshield before final paint and reassembly. I will report back on how this goes.

Oilburner
01-13-2014, 07:25 PM
Lot's of time rust around windshield was created by bad job with windshield re-installation, so be aware about, please.

israndy
01-13-2014, 08:24 PM
I had to replace my windshield this summer due to a rock hit and they got the old one out w/o further cracking it, it was not the original winds(creen|hield) however, had a part number in the lower passenger corner. There was VERY LITTLE rust, I was expecting a disaster. I sanded and rustoleumed, but I hear rust never sleeps.

-Randy

lindenengineering
01-13-2014, 08:40 PM
To do this right!
We have done three so far!

Means removal of the windscreen/windshield and soda blast (Do not use sand blast techniques) the area to remove all rust, immediately etch prime the area, use high build to repair any surface divits, prep and paint & the area without breaking through the seal into the metal.

Then you will never see the rust come back --at least for the lifetime of the vehicle.
We have used Dupont Imron on one unit--looked nice when finished
Dennis

FlyingBreadBox
01-13-2014, 08:48 PM
My 2003 had this as well . I first removed the hood ( use two people!). I then scraped, wire brushed ( small hand wire brush and with a small "Dremel like" rotary brush), sanded then coated with rust mort . I then primed and painted by hand with a brush. I was able to pull the rubber back with a old putty knife ( smooth rounded edges) and get in a 1/4 inch to the lip. I used common nails every inch around the seal to allow air in to cure the primer and paint. This took several coats to get everything coated moving the nails each time. I will paint it again next summer. I have years of paint experience on homes at the beach in Santa Cruz CA. If you stay on top of it and maintain the top coat it should last a lot longer. I also wax it there and keep it clean. I used no body filler because I want to keep a close eye on it. It looks so much better, no scabs growing through the paint anymore.

thinice
01-13-2014, 11:17 PM
Sounds like your leaning towards removing the windshield & that would probably be the way to go for best results. I did a DYI repair leaving the windshield in. Think my windshield was poorly replaced at some point. Donít know if my rubber gasket is factory or not but I was able to remove it and replace once I made my repairs. There is a drain channel around the edge of the windscreen that rusts if it gets plugged up. In my case some rubber spacers were set behind the windscreen and protruded out blocking the drain channel. I cut them away and spend a lot of time carefully scrapping and sanding all around the windshield, then applied rust solution liberally. The bottom was bad, went at it with a body grinder. On my first try I used a spray can to repaint, It was thin, messy, and didnít last but a year. I went back and did it again with more care (good for two years now) using Rust paint in a can, applied with a small artist brush to get a good thick coverage in the channel. Like Vic mentioned the bottom does not show so I did not use any filler expecting to maybe redo in a few year or maybe try Vicís suggestion of some sort of protective flat which may or may not trap even more moisture? While you at it I would check around the wheel wells and under the foot well liners a common area for more rust. See Photo. Good Luck, Tim.

jujupang
01-14-2014, 02:02 AM
I just had a body shop in Venice, California remove all the rust that had resulted from an inexpensive windshield replacement done 7 years ago. The windshield shop must have rushed and scratched the paint removing the gasket. Rust developed on the top edge mostly but was appearing all around. Fortunately I had just caught a rock and chipped the windshield, the ins. company paid for a new windshield replacement, the body shop did a good job of grinding out the rust, putting on a rust inhibitor then bondo to even out the surface before painting. I watched them squeeze out adhesive before putting in the new gasket then I watched one man easily lift the new glass and with the aid of one man to help guide the glass in, it was done. To do the job the shop also removed the hood in the beginning.

I hear that MBenz cars are prone to rust. I had rust problems with an '84 300TD.

Juju

Mike5999
01-14-2014, 03:57 AM
Happened to me before (well 3 times because i had 3 vans) and i fixed one. I cut the rubber off the edge of the windsheild and used an angle grinder to grind out all the rust , then used body-filler to fill in the places where
Rust penetrated and rotted the peice. Fiberglass works for bigger pieces. Sand , prime, paint, #done

kenj356
01-14-2014, 02:54 PM
That sounds like the way to go.

Aqua Puttana
01-14-2014, 07:19 PM
I really don't care what course anyone takes, and I really do mean that.

Some may view my windscreen sealant repair as a shortcut non-professional solution. I didn't choose that route without some thought.

My 2004 Sprinter body and other metals are being defeated by the Western New York WNY winters and road salt. The undecarriage and most of the mechanicals are holding up better than many of my other vehicles of similar years/age in WNY (but are still deteriorating). The body paint, not so much because it pretty much just sucks. Based upon the overall condition of the vehicle, for me, the cost and effort of removing the windshield is throwing good money after bad.

My method of removing the rubber seal piece, cleaning up the rust/painting provides good body/paint for the new sealant bead to adhere and seal to. Unless the rusting is really severe, the structural integrity of the rusting metal holding the glass in place has not deteriorated to the point of being an issue. Whether the body metal is ground down and replaced by fiberglass filler, or just cleaned up and filled in with sealant is a moot point. On a vehicle in similar condition to mine, my sealant bead repair will likely outlast the vehicle anyway. My object is to stop the leaking and reatard the rusting. Here in WNY the rusting will never be "stopped".

Removal of the glass and extensive repair may very well be "proper", but it may not be the best monetary choice on an older vehicle like mine.

:2cents:

thinice
01-14-2014, 09:52 PM
I really don't care what course anyone takes, and I really do mean that.

Some may view my windscreen sealant repair as a shortcut non-professional solution. I didn't choose that route without some thought.

My 2004 Sprinter body and other metals are being defeated by the Western New York WNY winters and road salt. The undecarriage and most of the mechanicals are holding up better than many of my other vehicles of similar years/age in WNY (but are still deteriorating). The body paint, not so much because it pretty much just sucks. Based upon the overall condition of the vehicle, for me, the cost and effort of removing the windshield is throwing good money after bad.

My method of removing the rubber seal piece, cleaning up the rust/painting provides good body/paint for the new sealant bead to adhere and seal to. Unless the rusting is really severe, the structural integrity of the rusting metal holding the glass in place has not deteriorated to the point of being an issue. Whether the body metal is ground down and replaced by fiberglass filler, or just cleaned up and filled in with sealant is a moot point. On a vehicle in similar condition to mine, my sealant bead repair will likely outlast the vehicle anyway. My object is to stop the leaking and reatard the rusting. Here in WNY the rusting will never be "stopped".

Removal of the glass and extensive repair may very well be "proper", but it may not be the best monetary choice on an older vehicle like mine.

:2cents:

I'm with you Vic. Rust never sleeps on a Sprinter and we all have different levels of compulsiveness. After all, they are used vehicles. Maybe I would feel differently living in the sun belt were the salt never falls. I really like my Sprinter but there are other priorities too. No need to be defensive. I always look to your post for the common sense approach.

israndy
01-15-2014, 04:08 PM
I had just caught a rock and chipped the windshield, the ins. company paid for a new windshield replacement
Juju

What? My deductible is more than the cost of the windshield, how did you get your insurance to cover it?

-Randy

Aqua Puttana
01-15-2014, 05:23 PM
What? My deductible is more than the cost of the windshield, how did you get your insurance to cover it?

-Randy
One of the few extra insurance riders which I maintain is "Full Glass Coverage". I feel the cost is worthwhile.

I did have problems one time with that insurance though. I had an old vehicle which I decided no longer needed collision insurance. I called and asked them to cancel collision. A while later I noticed that they had also cancelled the full glass coverage so I called them. The agent said that they couldn't re-instate the coverage because the vehicle was too old. Had I kept the coverage then it would have just continued. Needless to say, because they had cancelled it without my request the coverage was re-instated.

Be aware that on older vehicles it may not be available and not to let it lapse if you have it.

:2cents: vic

mike01001
01-15-2014, 11:52 PM
I had some bad leprosy on my 2006 (480,000 miles) around the windshield and above it to the roof line. It looked like a mine field. Glass companies said they would no longer put glass in because of the amount of rust would not allow the adhesive to hold the glass in. I went to Maaco for the rust work because they had the only shop that could fit my van into a spray booth. They told me the glass may break on removal (which it did of course and added $280 to the bill) But they did an excellent job repairing it for just over a $1000 plus $280 for the glass. I put 70,000 to 80,000 miles per year on the van and go through a windshield per year and that repair enables me to stave off another van purchase for a bit longer for work.

israndy
01-16-2014, 03:11 PM
I might be jealous, would love to see that much of the country, unless you are putting that many miles on just driving to Costco, that would get old quick. I do love driving the Sprinter, but that many miles I can imagine being quite the pain in the foot trying to keep the pedal to the metal, pain the the knees trying to find another place to put them during all the time behind the wheel, pain the ear listening the highway and the vans hollow echo hour after hour. I love that the nose is as short as it is, almost like my old VW Bus style, but I just wish that engine cover were possible to get my foot around without making a production of it. Would be more comfortable for the actual long haul.

-Randy

pneumatician
03-12-2015, 09:59 PM
Decided to bite the bullet and have the windscreen rust sorted. Took the motorhome to a bodyshop and they removed the screen ground out what "little" rust they could find then prepped and resprayed the cab finally replacing the screen.

The bodyshop seem to think that my spraying various rust neutralisers and WD40 around the screen had actually helped prevent rust. Made the pre-paint prep difficult for them though.

edj
03-13-2015, 01:36 AM
Decided to bite the bullet and have the windscreen rust sorted. Took the motorhome to a bodyshop and they removed the screen ground out what "little" rust they could find then prepped and resprayed the cab finally replacing the screen.

The bodyshop seem to think that my spraying various rust neutralisers and WD40 around the screen had actually helped prevent rust. Made the pre-paint prep difficult for them though.

Mind sharing what it cost to have that work done? Thanks.

PATECO
03-13-2015, 09:04 PM
What? My deductible is more than the cost of the windshield, how did you get your insurance to cover it?

-Randy

In Florida, 100% Windshield Replacement Coverage is mandatory. I drive a lot of miles, and so have had to replace several. All have been covered by insurance without deductible.

aspen
03-13-2015, 10:19 PM
What often happens, the glass person replacing glass would be not careful and cut through paint when removing old glass, a year or so later, after installation of new glass you have rust bubbles on the bottom of glass. I
I had a glass person come twice - to pull the glass and to install it couple days later. I worked on removing rust from the lip glass sits on and beyond, POR-15, primer, paint. It has been around 4 years and my repair is still in good shape.

Val

pneumatician
03-28-2015, 11:17 PM
Apologies for tardiness in replying. Bearing in mind a windscreen company had quoted £300 just to take the screen out and put it back. The complete job cost just over a grand ( £1000).

lessline99
01-16-2016, 08:14 PM
hey guys,

Of course I have a lot of rust forming under my windshield like everyone else it seams like. Back in 2010 when I bought my T1N I had it resprayed and the rust so called "fixed" by the body shop. Well....now here in 2016 the rust is back and looks worst than before because all of the bond/body filler they used is now basically falling out bc there is rust below the bond/body filler and literally coming off in chunks. So I can go back to the body shop and get it done again...and again...and again....for years to come. But then I started to do a lil research and I found out that you can actually buy the "Top Cowl" for the windshield. Ive found it on the Chrysler factory parts website ... http://www.factorychryslerparts.com/showAssembly.aspx?ukey_assembly=541919&ukey_make=1062&ukey_model=15513&modelYear=2004&ukey_category=20301 ...which ends up being figure #2 which is $84 then they get you on the $30 shipping. Well, then i just typed in top cowl for sprinter on ebay and I can find them in the price range of $92-$125 with free shipping. So then I went to my sprinter to "investigate" how it will install. Well, with further inspection you have to literally cut out the old top cowl and then weld the new one in. Of course it isn't an easy bolt on part!. So if I'm going to replace it I might as well cut the whole dang thing out and weld in the brand new top cowl. Has ANYONE ever tried this or even thought about this method? If so, can you let me know how you went about doing it? Or, why you didn't go this route? The welding /grinding part isn't a big deal to me. I was thinking of maybe cutting out as much as I can and leave the some of the old cowl there and cut the new cowl to fit the old one. Or, just cutting it all out and going that direction. Im just a lil afraid that it won't line up correctly if I cut the whole thing out. I don't want to go the bond route bc to me i want it done correctly and I hate putting lipstick on a pig. Please feel free to comment or suggest anything I am always open to ideas and opinions!

_Lessline99

312d
01-17-2016, 12:54 AM
i did it, but not trying to get the rust out of it, it was a real PITA for me, you cannot do it alone, you need someone else to help you, not your mom or yor wife, i mean real muscular help.

312d
01-17-2016, 01:34 AM
if i recall good was near a hundred welding points, and the cowl overlaps under the A pillar skins on both sides, major dissasembly, air box, wiper mechanism, hood, hinges, heating pipes, interior trim, that might or not involve to take apart the dashboard, and probably the cabin interior roof.
the new cowl dont come predrilled. you will have to use the old one as a template to locate the new spot welds.
special tool cobalt drill bits specially sharpened like this http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Spot-Weld-Cutter-Drill-Bit-HSS-one-1-4-made-in-USA-/121639056363?hash=item1c5240b3eb:g:pTwAAOSwaNBUdiD S.
- seam sealant, cavities wax protection, primer, paint, air compressor, phosphoric acid, angle grinders , a lot of locking pliers, laser level, a MIG welder a lot of safety equipment , etc, etc. and lots of precious time.
i am not discouraging you with this, you can do it, but it wont be a walk in the park, it can take you weeks, i am just telling you what are you getting into, if you are really motivated, have the drive and knowledge you will do it better than most of body shops, who are always trying to get a shortcut on the job.

Aqua Puttana
01-17-2016, 11:32 AM
... lipstick on a pig. Please feel free to comment or suggest anything I am always open to ideas and opinions!

_Lessline99
I looked at a full blown repair on my 2004 as "lipstick on a pig". Given the overall condition it just isn't worth the time, money, or effort. My bottom repair has been good for over a year now. The top repair is a bit older.

Windshield Rust Hack Job

http://sprinter-source.com/forum/showthread.php?t=36676

I'll try to post a few update pictures in the repair thread.

:cheers: vic

lessline99
01-17-2016, 04:23 PM
Thanks 312d!

Don't get me wrong I am no body guy. And also I'm more of a grinder than a welder..haha. But I do have a lot of friends who are "state certified welders" and said they will help me out. I was hoping to knock this out in a afternoon and once it's finished have the windshield replaced since it's cracked and that's windshield #9 for me since I bought my sprinter in 2010. Hopefully #10 will stay a lil while. But looking at it could take weeks I can't do that being its my daily and I don't have a bay or inside storage to use. But how about cut out the top rusted area out and then cut the new piece to fit? So I won't be using the whole piece itself but a big cut out section so I won't have weld to the a pillars and all? From your experience is that do-able/easier shortcut or am I just wasting my time and thought? Thanks for your input!


Aqua,
Yeah man I saw your windshield repair work and so far that's my "back-up" plan. Looks good man :rad: I'm just the type of fix it yourself and your way is a very viable way. Hmm...



-lessline99

312d
01-17-2016, 04:43 PM
yes it can be done!! you just have to evaluate how much van is rotten, i did it also on another older van, but the damage wasn't really bad, i just like things to be the best they can be, the workmanship on other body shops i have known is less than acceptable, that is why i do prefer to do it myself. I have known (heard)cases where the repair was not done propperly resulting in windshield cracking after the repair was done due to structure stress or not taking into account the heat expansion and body flexing.

http://sprinter-source.com/forum/showthread.php?t=37815