PDA

View Full Version : Transmission trouble


maxzoom
09-27-2013, 03:04 PM
For the first time yesterday all of a sudden transmission has acted up. When I shifted into reverse, the transmission didn't engage right away. It took 2-3 seconds for transmission to engage. Same problem when I shifted into drive takes a couple seconds to engage. Temperature of engine has risen to 180-190 degrees for some reason. Always temp when driving use to be 170 -175 degrees. Oil level and radiator level normal.

Transmission level on dipstick is full and engine oil light black color (not red at all). Transmission is not leaking.

230,000 miles on this taxi with lots of idling. I have never changed the transmission oil.

Is it too late to fix this transmission? How about first change the transmission fluid and filter?

Any other ideas easy fixes to try on this transmission problem before one takes it to a mechanic?

maxzoom
10-01-2013, 02:41 PM
edit;

"Transmission level on dipstick is full and transmission fluid color is light black color (not red at all).

shortshort
10-01-2013, 02:55 PM
Change the trans fluid. Might be all it needs.

NelsonSprinter
10-01-2013, 09:10 PM
I thinks it's common on transmissions that have not had regular maintenance to have gears slip, red oil turns black and may be low. Changing all 8 quarts in pan and in torque convertor is usually all that's needed.

riskydnb
10-02-2013, 12:29 AM
Typically you have a 50/50 chance of fixing the tranny by changing the fluid in cases where the tranny is shuttering. I think the odds are less if its slipping. But hey give it a shot. What city are you located in BTW?

lindenengineering
10-02-2013, 12:54 PM
Just a note on changing fluid.
Its often neglected and as a shop owner I am always cautious when a customer pulls in the shop asking for a trans service. It usually means there is an undisclosed problem and the owner thinks that a service will fix all the ills.

In most cases it won't!

First I always do a series of tests on the transmission to see if there is a problem before even doing anything with hand tools. In any case I would refuse to service a transmission which has done more than 100K without a previous service having been done. Even then I would approach the job with caution.

The reason is simple a sudden fluid /filter service can cause transmission failure and the owner would claim that my business ruined his transmission.

You see, trans fluid is alkalinity in nature but gradually turns acidic in service. This hardens the seals and causes varnishes/sludge to form. When you change the fluid and filter after a neglectful regimen it "shocks" the transmission and often causes a failure shortly thereafter.

This is uppermost in my mind because last week I had a customer who had done 127K on his Landrover and he was complaining about intermittent reverse application problems. Insisting a service might fix it we went ahead. Within 15 miles on test it wouldn't change up into 4th and it was toast!
So a new rebuild" was installed (read spendy!) and they are a darn sight more expensive than a Sprinter NAG1!

If you buy a used Sprinter with a doubtful history change only a partial amount of the fluid over several weeks until you get the alkalinity back, then change it out.

An exchange TIN Sprinter transmission will put you back about $2500 to $3000 with at least 5 hour labor bill.
In any case with these numbers a regular service schedule is cheap.
Keep on trucking!:thumbup:
Dennis

maxzoom
10-04-2013, 02:08 PM
Typically you have a 50/50 chance of fixing the tranny by changing the fluid in cases where the tranny is shuttering. I think the odds are less if its slipping. But hey give it a shot. What city are you located in BTW?



The tranny does not seem to shutter. A few years back this Sprinter shaked and shuttered. We replaced the drive line and this Sprinter stopped shaking.

The slipping of the transmission, the engine temperature went up 20 degrees, and the transmission/vehicle sounds a little different like it's not in the right gear.

I drove this Sprinter home and I'm not using it anymore. The next morning I check this Sprinter and it does go into reverse and drive right away.

I am located in Unalaska/Dutch Harbor Alaska. Remote location.

maxzoom
10-05-2013, 03:31 PM
""Just a note on changing fluid.
If you buy a used Sprinter with a doubtful history change only a partial amount of the fluid over several weeks until you get the alkalinity back, then change it out.""

Dennis, Thanks for the post on transmissions.

Here is the history of my 2005 Sprinter; bought it brand new, used as our taxi cab service, 236,000 miles ,maximum speed limit on the island is 30 mph. I changed the engine oil/filter every 10,000 miles, air filter often Dutch Harbor is a dusty town and fuel filter 2 times.

The transmission oil and filter have never been changed. I did check and add about 1/2 a pint of transmission fluid a year or so ago. Transmission is not leaking.

Change only partial amount of the fluid over several weeks"?

Change the transmission filter now too?

How about try some additives at the car parts store like? "Trans-X" "Automatic transmission slip-stop & leak fix"

Leave this Sprinter alone? (Keep on driving till the transmission goes out totally)

lindenengineering
10-05-2013, 10:00 PM
Maxzoom

Since this is your van and your transmission, and it is showing some faults I would simply drop the lot and service it--Basically kill or cure!

You are likely to find a lot of contamination of the speed sensors located in the circuit board mounted on the underside of the valve block.

Andy B (DocktorA ) has blogged about this issue/discovery on these forums, so you should be able to read up on it.

So if it was mine I would buy a new circuit board and terminal socket, 8 qrts of fluid, a pan gasket and filter. It might be prudent to buy a torque converter drain plug and washer.

With it all drained drop the valve block and replace the circuit board. Do it on a bench sat on some kitchen towel.

Put it all back together fill it with the 8 qrts of fluid and go drive it.

I had two similar units on box truck delivery units a few months back and did the same thing following reports of a similar situation as yours.
One failed shortly thereafter, the other is still out there scudding about doing autopart deliveries in the Rockies.
Best of luck and let us know how you get on.
Cheers Dennis

shortshort
10-06-2013, 02:33 PM
... it "shocks" the transmission...

Can you elaborate on that? Right down to exactly which piece of the trans changes it's physical state? I've always maintained this is the kind of anecdotal bullsh*t that will forever haunt these discussions, and that the real issue is the underlying failure running its course.

Doesn't the trans computer adapt over time? Maybe a reset (doable with DAD?) would lessen the "shock."

lindenengineering
10-06-2013, 07:32 PM
Can you elaborate on that? Right down to exactly which piece of the trans changes it's physical state? I've always maintained this is the kind of anecdotal bullsh*t that will forever haunt these discussions, and that the real issue is the underlying failure running its course.

Doesn't the trans computer adapt over time? Maybe a reset (doable with DAD?) would lessen the "shock."

For info
"Shocks" the transmission chemically it goes from a predominantly acidic back to an alkaline state. This in turn strips acidic based varnishes and other chemically derives contamination within the valve block & governor etc causing drive-ability problems. The seals which have gone into a hardened state due to an overly acidic condition/state slowly soften and assume a new form which leads to internal leakage and clutch speed failures.

This is a condition well known in ZF and Voith DIWA transmission circles where it is mentioned on training courses of which I have often attended as a zone rep. These transmissions like the ZF 5HP 500 are know to do more than 500,000 miles in city shift conditions without repair--if they are serviced correctly.

Toyota ( the long mileage duration king of the world's roads ) mention the same thing if you go into service info on their tech website. Techstream info will mention it.

Of course if you work only on Yankee based crap, their transmissions can't rarely run past 100K before tearing themselves up so this condition rarely occurs.
Dennis