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Sprinter Dog
09-02-2013, 01:27 AM
Hi,

This weekend I am trying to change the antifreeze in our 06 Sprinter.

We bought the Sprinter, used, with 100k 2 years ago & service records. Now the mileage is about 115k .

I have read as much as I could find about antifreeze, but I am still confused. Some say its ok to mix colars,some say not.

I had planned on draining the system,refilling with distilled water, running till hot with heater on, cooling down, draining,then repeat the whole process untill the drained water looked clear. Then filling to get the 50% recommended antifreeze-water ratio.

This is how I have done my coolent system maintance to other vehicles in the past.

However I have never had a vehicle that required G05 before.

When I drained the old fluid, it was green.

I was at my local NAPA purching some G05 coolent. I brought a sample of the coolent I had just drained from our sprinter[see picture below]. The fellow at the counter said very dangerious to mix colors.He recomended I go to dealer to have system flushed before adding any new type off coolant.

Now I am not sure what to do.

Is just a little green stuff left in the system going to react that badly with the new G05 ?

Can anyone help me?

http://sprinter-source.com/forum/picture.php?albumid=174&pictureid=881

Aqua Puttana
09-02-2013, 01:51 AM
My opinions.
...
Now I am not sure what to do.

Is just a little green stuff left in the system going to react that badly with the new G05 ?

Can anyone help me?
...
I see nothing a dealership would do that would flush the system better than what you outlined.

The small amount of non-G05 coolant that MAY BE left after the flush you described will not hurt anything.

To my knowledge G05 coolant doesn't come in green. That said, the guy who told you not to mix colors may not understand that even though it is the same basic formula, proper G05 coolant can come in different colors which will mix just fine.

Don't overthink this. It is just a cooling system that should have specific long life HOAT hybrid organic acid technology G05 coolant. Brand preference/color is just that, brand preference. Good luck. vic

sailquik
09-02-2013, 01:59 AM
Stewart,
Why not simply go to your local Mercedes Benz Sprinter dealer and purchase the factory approved coolant.
It may cost a bit more that what you get at your local auto parts store, but it will be the right formula and will
overall probably be the best for your engine's cooling system.
Whatever you buy, it MUST say "Approved under MB BEVO 325.? (Check your owners manual for the correct ".?").
If I remember, the specified Mercedes coolont is clear...not green!
Roger

NelsonSprinter
09-02-2013, 02:07 AM
While I agree that different coolants shouldn't mix, you've got the right plan to minimize the amount. The Napa guy probably didn't know how well you flush it yourself.

cahaak
09-02-2013, 02:23 AM
The color doesn't matter as the correct chemistry comes in several colors. Just use the G05 coolant and you are set. One thing you could do, is for your final flush, use distilled water, then drain that and top off with G05 (1/2 the total system capacity) and then the rest distilled water. That will give you a mixture of G05 and mostly distilled water in a 50:50 ratio. Unless you really have a contaminated system, it really should not need much flushing.

Chris

shortshort
09-02-2013, 06:54 AM
Add a (permanent) drain hose to the radiator valve. This will make you happy.

chads
09-02-2013, 11:43 AM
When you refill be careful about putting cold water into hot engine it can crack block.
Fill with hot water or wait till it cools down.
Find your block drains it will speed things up.
Chad

skydiver007
09-02-2013, 12:37 PM
I personally have never seen G05 in green. It normally is a very light red color and sometimes clear. If your Sprinter has green in it, it was probably changed by someone who didn't know that MB requires a different coolant. I don't know how important coolant type really is, but if MB recommends it, I am going to use it and nothing else.

I have also tried mixing it myself but recently after I noticed mine running hot with a winter mix in it, I bought the premix and now she runs a lot cooler. I run 60% in the winter for trips to ND and other points way north.

Aqua Puttana
09-02-2013, 01:21 PM
I like 09Hemi's information here. Some of it may be opinion, but he seems to have a handle on coolants.


Ok this subject has been covered several times on this board if someone wanted to do a search............ but lets go over it one more time for the badly uninformed.

First I'd like to say as a Forum Leader Mr. Carlito Benito you should be better informed and your posts should not be giving the bad information you have posted in this thread!

Now on to the facts on coolant.

There are three different types of ethylene gycol coolant;

1) IAT ~ Inorganic Acid Technology type coolant ~ this is the traditional "green" formula coolant. This is the stuff that General Motors used until 1996, Chrysler used until 2001, and Ford used until 2002 in its trucks and 2003 in its passenger cars. This is the orginal "green Prestone" we all remember even though Prestone hasn't made this stuff in years! It is available from other manufacturers such as Peak and from NAPA, (their house brand is made by Peak) The green additive package contains phosphate and silicates, and provides good protection for cast iron and aluminum engine parts as well as copper/brass radiators in older vehicles and aluminum radiators in newer vehicles. The corrosion fighting chemicals are fast acting but wear out after two or three years or 36K miles of average use so original "green" IAT type coolants need to be changed out every year or two to minimize the risk of corrosion damage. The problem with "old type" IAT coolants is that the high levels of silicates in them eventually drop out of solution leading to loss of corrosion protection and cooling system problems.

2)OAT ~ Organic Acid Technology type coolant ~ is usually dyed orange to distinguish it from other types of coolant. In 1996 GM began a new extended life coolant call "Dex-Cool". This coolant contains a totally different type of additive package called organic acid technology (OAT). The OAT corrosion inhibitors are slower acting and provide protection over a longer period of time. OAT coolants typically have a service life of up to five years or 150K miles, making coolant changes less frequent, but still necessary.
OAT corrosion inhibitors provide excellent long term protection for aluminum or cast iron but may not be the best choice for older cooling systems that have copper/brass radiators or heater cores.
There have been many problems documented with this type of coolant. Other manufacturers that currently use OAT type coolant as factory fill include 1996 and up Audi, Jauguar, Porche, Volkswagen and Land Rover, 2001 and newer Saab, 1996 and newer Toyota, Nissan, Honda and Mazda.
Many GM vehicles that this coolant was spec'd for developed problems with engine cooling passage gaskets deteriorating to the point of failure, leading to expensive engine repairs. More importantly OAT type coolants have been found to form sludge deposits in engines that have open air, non-pressurized coolant overflow bottles as found in all Jeep WJ Grand Cherokees! It has been shown that Dex-Cool and its clones form heavy sludge deposits in the open to the atmosphere coolant recovery bottles of many vehicles, these sludge deposits are then sucked into the radiator and engine as normal coolant heating and cooling cycles occur. Once this has happened, it may be impossible to fully remove these deposits from your radiator or engine! Dex-Cool also contains a known plasticizer, 2-ethylhexanoic acid (2-EHA), in it's corrosion inhibitor package. That means some cooling system components and seals may eventually fail after prolonged contact with Dex-Cool. The end tanks found in all WJ radiators are made of plastic and will weaken and eventually fail with prolonged contact to Dex-Cool and it's clones. Other cooling system components may or may not be compatible with OAT type Dex-Cool...... do you know how long they might last exposed to it??

Virtually all Prestone coolant products are OAT type coolants and should not be used in 2001 and newer Mopar vehicles. This includes Prestone Any/Make Model, it is a Dex-Cool clone, read the label! Don't use it!

This doesn't make OAT type coolants necessarily bad, in a perfectly maintained cooling system, seviced every year or two not every five years (with a closed, pressurized coolant recovery bottle) they work just fine! These OAT type coolants are just a bad choice for our open air coolant recovery bottle WJ's, especially since there is a better alternative developed by Mercedes and adopted by Mopar in 2001.......... HOAT type coolant!!

3) HOAT Hybrid Organic Acid Technology coolant ~ this type coolant is usually dyed yellow, but may also be dyed orange, or red (Orange is the way Mopar dyes it!). HOAT type coolants are currently used as factory fill by Ford, Chrysler, Mercedes, BMW and Volvo. This coolant has been in use by Mercedes for almost 20 years with excellent results. It was first developed for long haul, over the road, truckers who wanted a coolant that could be used safely for hundreds of thousands of miles! The additive package in HOAT type coolants contains small amounts of silicates for added aluminum component corrosion protection. The small amount of silicate found in a HOAT type coolant is significantly less than found in traditional "green" IAT coolant, and not likely to fall out of solution forming the small green globs of snot we all remember when using traditional green Prestone! Most of the coolants in this catagory also meet European "GO5" specs for hybrid extended life coolant. Thats why sometimes HOAT type coolant is also called GO5. The service life for HOAT is also five years or 150K miles.

This modern technology coolant is spec'd by Chrysler for every vehicle manufactured since 2001. It has all of the benefits of a modern technology long life coolant with non of the downside or problems associated with OAT or Dex-Cool type coolants. It is the best choice for coolant in every WJ [insert Sprinter here]. Period!! Case Closed!!

Now on to "universal coolants" such as Prestone Any/Make Model and the rest that claim to be good for "everything" ~ Complete BS!! The problem with "universal coolants" is that a single formula cannot meet the conflicting OEM specs for IAT, OAT, and HOAT type coolants. If a universal coolant contains silicates, it does not meet the OEM OAT specification. If it contains no silicates, it can't meet the OEM HOAT specification. And if it contains phosphates or inorganic acid technology ingredients it cannot meet the OEM OAT or HOAT specs. Universal coolants are usually OAT or sometimes HOAT formulas and can be used to top off traditional IAT type coolants but then will not have the longer service life of a modern type coolant. If you do this the coolant should be changed annually.

It is a very, very bad idea to mix OAT type (Dex-Cool or any Prestone "Universal" product) with HOAT type coolant. Sludge will form,and it will be near impossible to get it all out of your engine and radiator! See the pics posted above by Chris142 in this thread.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Last edited by 09Hemi; 10-19-2012 at 02:24 PM.

This will get you to the original thread.

http://www.jeepsunlimited.com/forums/showthread.php?p=4424959#post4424959

vic

Edit: Further reading of that thread shows some foum banter as to member 09Hemi, but I didn't see where anyone refuted any of his major points.

Sprinter Dog
09-02-2013, 05:48 PM
Thanks everybody,

I am proceeding with my complete flush and fill protocol outlined in first post.

The quote from the jeep forum in Aqua Puttana's last post was very informative. The last line a little scary.

Thanks Vic.

"It is a very, very bad idea to mix OAT type (Dex-Cool or any Prestone "Universal" product) with HOAT type coolant. Sludge will form, and it will be near impossible to get it all out of your engine and radiator! See the pics posted above by Chris142 in this thread."

I am thinking the green stuff I am draining is the above "Prestone"

Wow.

Thanks again everybody, Stewart

Aqua Puttana
09-02-2013, 08:34 PM
...
I am thinking the green stuff I am draining is the above "Prestone"

Wow.

...
As I said earlier, don't over think this. Most times when people have been adding and mixing coolant types it is because they have a leak so the volumes can be high. In your case you plan to flush the system. That will mean that there will be very little residue of the old stuff left. You will be just fine.

Not that you mentioned it, but do not use any aftermarket additives. They are likely not compatible with the HOAT technology. vic

Tom9054
09-03-2013, 12:33 AM
Sooo, distilled water is good enough for a flush solution? Not knowing the history on my van and doing a kwik search there seems to be many diesel flush solutions on the market, plus 1 suggests 50% white vinegar and water?
Yup, cold weathers coming...

Tom9054
09-03-2013, 11:42 AM
As I said earlier, don't over think this. Most times when people have been adding and mixing coolant types it is because they have a leak so the volumes can be high. In your case you plan to flush the system. That will mean that there will be very little residue of the old stuff left. You will be just fine.

Not that you mentioned it, but do not use any aftermarket additives. They are likely not compatible with the HOAT technology. vic

think Vic already answered my question if I would just read a bit better!

nevermind

shortshort
09-03-2013, 03:45 PM
Sooo, distilled water is good enough for a flush solution? Not knowing the history on my van and doing a kwik search there seems to be many diesel flush solutions on the market, plus 1 suggests 50% white vinegar and water?
Yup, cold weathers coming...

I would not add a foreign chemical. If you have the time to wait for cool down, do drive a couple miles between fill/drain cycles, and carry a gallon of distilled water to top up after the final fill. Repeatedly squeezing the upper radiator hose does a nice job of bleeding the system, but I invariably need to add a quart after about 3 miles. If you initially drain into a graduated bucket, you will know how much did not go back in the first time. If you plan to do flush cycles with water, don't bother with the block drain (unless, of course, you got one of the sexy bleed nipple style bolts. Dr A posted they put those on "factory" rebuilt motors).