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sailquik
06-13-2013, 05:04 AM
Is it my imagination or is ULSD (straight fuel, no bio mass mixtures) getting harder to find, and are the major truck stops a bit reluctant to advertise and post that they are no longer supplying pure ULSD?
Just got back from 6 days of driving (Hatteras, NC to Worthington, MN and return).
On the way out to MN, I didn't pay too much attention until I got to MN (where I'm reasonably sure I've heard the farm lobby has mandated biomass diesel everywhere).
Anyway, at Casey's General Store, nothing on the pumps indicating any bio content.
Next fill @ Cenex in West Salem, WI....no indication of bio content.
Next fill @ Flying J in So. Beloit, IL....no indications of bio content, but brand new pumps so maybe the stickers weren't on yet.
Next fill @ Speedway in South Bend, IN.... no indication of bio content.
Next fill @ Sunoco on Ohio turnpike.... no indication of bio content.
Next fill @ Flying J/Pilot in Breezewood, PA....sticker said B5-B20 (between 5% and 20% biomass blend) very small yellow sticker stuck on above the ULSD <15% suphur content sticker!
Next fill @ Love's Travel Plaza in Ruther Glen, VA....small yellow sticker above the ULSD states
5%-20% biomass blend. I asked them if they had any REAL diesel and was told that all their diesel is 5% bio.
I asked if they were going to pay for my out of warranty repairs caused by using more than the 5% allowable bio content and they said it was only 5%, but it was a manager and she changed her story very quickly when she heard that MB will not approve > 5% bio.
So....anyone else having this issue.....are the major fuel producers really giving us the actual (by testing) bio content info?
My last fuel stop was @ BP in Chesapeake (Hanbury BP) and there is no indication that their fuel has any bio content...at least not displayed on the pump, but I will be asking from now on.
Roger

piper1
06-13-2013, 06:46 AM
The Federal Trade Commission has fairly straightforward retail pump label requirements.

No bio content added , no label required to indicate this

Biodiesel requires a blue label indicating the percentage (or range of %'s) of bio added

Biomass requires an orange label indicating the percentage (or range of %'s) of bio added

Biodiesel is the refined fuel that is created in a reactor (transesterified lipids).

Biomass is ......well....something that someone thinks will burn in an engine

Guess which one is a good idea to avoid? Guess which one is responsible for most of the "problems" that get attributed to biodiesel?

Generally speaking...biodiesel is added when it is a state requirement (it's expensive to make) or a retailer wants to sell it. Biomass is added to save money. Pilot/Flying J, Loves and many truck stops are not in the business of selling good fuel...and lately...not even for a competitive price (Pilot/J has a lot of lawsuits to pay for over their rebate scam to trucking companies...a rant for another day).

cahaak
06-13-2013, 04:42 PM
We are under BD mandate here in MN (5% now and heading to 10 in a bit). Fuel is fine. As Piper says, it is a refined product, usually the methyl ester of whatever the fatty acid (triglyceride) input is. Although the BTU content is just slightly lower than regular diesel, it has great lubricity, better cetane and is a good fuel. The main issue with it is that the solvating power of it is higher than regular diesel (ester molecule vs regular alkane / aromatic). Could potentially loosen things in the fuel system as they accumulate. Not really an issue with rubber fuel components at this point as they are all fluoropolymer lined and very resistant to fuels like this. I personally think it is a great addition to diesel if properly refined as long as we don't get into a situation where food and fuel are competing it is a good idea.

Chris

SOLBRTs
06-13-2013, 05:07 PM
Food and fuel are already competing.

showkey
06-14-2013, 02:11 AM
http://i398.photobucket.com/albums/pp70/showkey_bucket/biodiesel_zpsb6492934.jpg (http://s398.photobucket.com/user/showkey_bucket/media/biodiesel_zpsb6492934.jpg.html)

Typical label found in Illinois..........with no real % defined.

In many areas it is really impossible to find straight diesel.....in Illinois there is a huge state incentive program on both gas and diesel blending.

Mrdi
06-16-2013, 11:19 PM
Bottom Line?
Are we OK fueling an NCV3 with a Biodiesel Fuel?
What % is max 5% ?

showkey
06-17-2013, 02:21 AM
Bottom Line?
Are we OK fueling an NCV3 with a Biodiesel Fuel?
What % is max 5% ?

Yes........we are ok.........the book does say 5% but in many markets that is not realistic or even possible........MB sold the Sprinter, knowing North American fuel situation.......so there is little chance they can claim improper fuel........since fuel is EPA approved and the truck must meet EPA specifications.

VW recently changed their % allowed to be more realistic.

piper1
06-17-2013, 03:33 AM
Bottom Line?
Are we OK fueling an NCV3 with a Biodiesel Fuel?
What % is max 5% ?

Biodiesel is fine. If it was my Sprinter..I would avoid biomass (the orange label). Biodiesel has excellent lubricity and fuel system cleaning properties. Biomass has few standards and can be quite "dry".

jimmiejoe
07-03-2013, 05:13 PM
Excerpt from Biodiesel Magazine:

Even though for years biodiesel has been heralded as a lubricity additive helping keep fuel system components like the moving parts inside fuel injection systems operating smoothly, the bitter irony here is that, when post-injected, it tends to dilute engine oil and interacts with additives and increases the possibility of engine wear. Much work remains developing viscosity improving, anti-wear, dispersant and detergent additive packages in which adverse reactions with biodiesel are significantly reduced.

Dingo
07-03-2013, 06:01 PM
Biomass not good for infernal combustion engines , bio fuel is better . However i would like to think that if large petro companies are adding bio to their dino diesel stocks , it is something they have refined themselves .

Working on this principle , i would have expected that they would do so on a very large basis & that the testign of the resultant brew was free of methanol & hydroxide as well as any free soaps in the mix

piper1
07-03-2013, 11:13 PM
Excerpt from Biodiesel Magazine:

Even though for years biodiesel has been heralded as a lubricity additive helping keep fuel system components like the moving parts inside fuel injection systems operating smoothly, the bitter irony here is that, when post-injected, it tends to dilute engine oil and interacts with additives and increases the possibility of engine wear. Much work remains developing viscosity improving, anti-wear, dispersant and detergent additive packages in which adverse reactions with biodiesel are significantly reduced.

MB 229.52 oil has been developed with this in mind. Not aware of anyone in North America approved for MB229.52.... yet.

If you follow the service recommendations, use the approved oil (MB229.51 or 229.52) you will be fine on bio-diesel blends up to 5%. I ran 11% quite a bit and never saw anything in my used oil sample reports to indicate it was an issue....but I wouldn't want to go much higher.