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View Full Version : Air in fuel...CORK IT!


Buckskinner
04-30-2013, 02:42 AM
The sensor hole and drain in the bottom of fuel filters may be effectively sealed with an epoxy coated cork, smear a little epoxy around the seal after insertion.
A wooden dowel coated with epoxy would work as well, just clean the surfaces and use a fuel safe epoxy...
Guys sitting on a case of filters, or the cheap ones that tend to leak could use this technique and save some bucks...

surlyoldbill
04-30-2013, 05:12 AM
A rubber stopper might be the better bet.

Buckskinner
04-30-2013, 05:52 AM
Hi Bill,
I agree rubber may be better...my concern is I have had a hard time getting glues and I think some epoxies to stick to rubber and i don't know why, as rubber is kinda porous; however, I have made a plug with fuel hose, filling same with epoxy, probably for an air compressor or something. A rubber hose plug may be more readily available than cork anyway.
My 66 gmc pickup with 305 v6, had a bad float in the carb, I removed the brass tang from the fuel saturated old black float, then carefully carved and epoxy coated a piece of cork adding the tang and hinge to it with a brass brad and more epoxy, that truck ran for several more years...
You don't seem so surly to me, sir! Your many posts here are quite a
contribution...David

surlyoldbill
04-30-2013, 06:09 AM
I'd kind of worry about getting epoxy in the fuel, or that the fuel may eat it. I guess it's on the dirty side of the filter, though.
I used some gas-proof epoxy to fix a float on one of my Corvairs, it worked for years. I was a little concerned about brazing it, what with it reeking of gas even after a week in the sun.

Buckskinner
04-30-2013, 06:36 AM
Bill,
MarineTex is my favorite epoxy, though being out of it, on the fuel filter I used a two part putty epoxy I think called Propoxy from Advance. On that cork float it was a cheap transparent epoxy from in two little tubes from a chain hardware store FoxyEpoxy.
On that old gmc pickup, I pulled the fuel tank and damn near coated the whole bottom of the tank with marine tex and it lasted for twenty years, said tank had old epoxy and rust, filled it with water to sand and prep to avoid sparks...some of these epoxies like the putty will stick to wet surfaces, though did not work on PVC water pipe.
A Corvair was a fine driver and roomy...missing the cars of old...David

Aqua Puttana
04-30-2013, 01:24 PM
I repaired a lower unit case crack in an old outboard with Marine Tex epoxy. It was in contact with 90w gear lube for over 30 years and no problem. I've used other brand epoxy to repair leaks on oil filled (10c mineral oil) transformer cooling fins with no problems too.

As was said, the proper expoxy in contact with fuel shouldn't be a problem. The plug material shouldn't really matter if the entire assembly is coated/sealed with epoxy, but a rubber plug may be difficult to use with epoxy. As an aside, epoxy is good for use in contact with brake fluid also.

JB Weld is a commonly available epoxy which should also be a good choice for this repair modification, not that I necessarily endorse doing away with the water in fuel drain capability. That said, there are many other brand diesel vehicles which don't have that feature. There have been very few posts here (none?) in the forum where people have indicated a need to purge water from their system. FWIW. vic

shortshort
04-30-2013, 04:31 PM
People seal the hollow frames of their dirt bikes with JB Weld and use them as fuel tanks. I've personally used it to seal leaking gas tanks.

Buckskinner
04-30-2013, 05:04 PM
Hi Vic,
Having read so many of your posts, I especially appreciate Cheap Tricks!
The drain plug is a nice feature on fuel filters, and less likely to leak or suck air...on my filter, the cheap drain plug broke during disassembly so I corked the hole.
A steel bolt or screw with clean threads, as I think you noted on an intercooler repair, makes a fine filler with epoxy, especially if the threads will grip the hole just a little bit. I just remembered repairing a radiator with marine tex and it held just fine...my intercooler will come out soon, and at this point I am hoping to find a repairable leak or replace same, just to be rid of the shutdown problem
Heading to Richmond today, harbor freight for tools and west marine for epoxy.
Thanks, David

Aqua Puttana
04-30-2013, 05:55 PM
People seal the hollow frames of their dirt bikes with JB Weld and use them as fuel tanks. I've personally used it to seal leaking gas tanks.
Your comment reminds me that I used some JB Weld to repair the injector area aluminum cover which I cracked.

I was impatient and didn't wait for the puller to arrive. :bash:

That repair is holding just fine. :thumbup: I often use a bit of aluminum screen (I also have nickel and ss screen $$) with the JB Weld to add strength.

...my intercooler will come out soon, and at this point I am hoping to find a repairable leak or replace same, ... Thanks, David
David,
Thanks.

Not that you asked...
If you do find an accessible, repairable crack in the intercooler I would first drill a stop hole at each end of the crack before the repair. Otherwise the crack may continue on even though the epoxy will hold. A bit of screen adds strength also. Sorry if I'm telling you what you already know.

For some time now I've figured a JB Weld repair on an intercooler is a good answer if you can access it. The part is not cheap. vic

Buckskinner
05-01-2013, 04:36 AM
Yes Vic,
...have used screen, even fiberglass screen...metal screen would suffice as a seal on the fuel filters, maybe roll a little strip after coating with JB, and sealing over with more epoxy, make an effective and fast low profile plug/patch.
Having never messed with fin tubes, your post is encouraging that a low cost repair may be made on intercooler...I have read up on your PVC air pressure adapter for testing...useful cause I can't find a cork that big, lol. Much thanks on the little screws to stop splitting, I might have missed that one.
Bought marine tex today, moderate hooray! David

Aqua Puttana
05-01-2013, 06:48 AM
... Much thanks on the little screws to stop splitting, I might have missed that one.
Bought marine tex today, moderate hooray! David
I suppose that you could install small screws, but just drilling the holes is generally all that is required. A crack has a tendency to continue to flex and creep. If a hole is drilled at the end(s) of the crack then the round shape in the metal relieves the stresses so the crack doesn't flex and run. The hole doesn't need to be very large, but with JB Weld or Marine Tex as a repair it can be pretty big because the epoxy will be sealing everything.

I've used fabric screen also, but where I have concern I generally choose metal screen when available. Screen also helps with caulking/sealant repairs too. It allows you to bridge fairly large holes and the screen continues to add strength after the sealant sets up.

Have fun. vic