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View Full Version : Replace alternator Belt on 2001 Sprinter


CRC
03-01-2013, 06:04 PM
Hi there,

I am about to replace the alternator belt on my 2001 Sprinter 311CDI, but before I would like to ask anyone here if is a complicated job or is a simple one. does someone here have a pictures or even a short movie about this?

Do I have to take the fan and radiator out or is any other way of doing it?

All the help is appreciated.


regards,

CRC :idunno::idunno:

jmoller99
03-01-2013, 06:47 PM
On the 2002 that I have, you need a long handle 12 point 17mm wrench. Get under the front end, find the tensioner, put the wrench on - push to towards the tire and the Belt should be removable. Take a few pictures of the belt before you remove it so you can get the new one on correctly. 20 minute job.

CRC
03-01-2013, 09:29 PM
Thank you for your help. So I don't need to remove the fan and radiator?:cheers::cheers:



Regards,
CRC

Vander
03-03-2013, 11:15 AM
Hell no, that would just be more work for you. Now if you were replacing the belt for the fan, then it's a different story, and you would, and it would be a bitch without the special tool. the alternator one is simple like jmoller99 said though you could also use a long handle 3/8 socket wrench with a 17mm 12point socket. The tensioner will be on the right side front of the engine (as if you are looking at if from the front) and it will look like a pointy round thing. Good luck.

Boater
03-04-2013, 12:21 AM
If it's the 2.2l engine covered by Haynes it looks like there is only one belt...???

If so you probably need the fan off but this should be possible without taking the rad out.
The fan shroud is attached to the radiator by spring clips, release them and you can push the shroud back over the fan to give you a narrow working/access space to the front of the fan.

The best bet for removing the fan is to get or make a fan holding tool which attaches to the bolts that hold the blades on so you can hold the fan/pump still while you undo the bolt (sometimes you can wedge the belt enough to hold it by friction). You can then lift the shroud out and get a look at the belt route.

Vander
03-04-2013, 02:31 AM
Curious why a 12 point (multi hex head) socket is used as opposed to a 6 point (single hex head)
for applying belt tension releasing leverage. 6 points are less likely to round nut heads. Most socket sets contain multi hex sockets as standard for convenience purposes.

Not sure what is is called, but the round thing you would put a wrench or a socket on to release the tension on the belt is star pointed with more than 6 points. I could not get a six point socket to fit over it because of all the extra points, much simpler to use something 12 pointed. But if you find a better way that works for you then thats fine too.

Aqua Puttana
03-04-2013, 02:43 AM
Curious why a 12 point (multi hex head) socket is used as opposed to a 6 point (single hex head)
for applying belt tension releasing leverage. 6 points are less likely to round nut heads. Most socket sets contain multi hex sockets as standard for convenience purposes.
A six point (hex) socket will not fit. The casting provides for a 12 point fastener style.

The history as I heard it as to 12 point wrenches is that our (USA) railroad equipment used 12 point fasteners as standard. A 12 point fitting is actually quite good at not rounding off when the proper 12 point closed end wrench is used. (12 bearing points are better than 6.)

Six sided hex fasteners were popular for many uses because they are a more simple design and less expensive to machine/produce than 12 point.

Mechanics being the resourceful types they are learned that 12 point wrenches would fit both 6 and 12 point fasteners. The 12 point does have more tendency to round off hex fasteners as you point out.

So that is probably more info than needed, but...

vic

P.S. - I believe that a square drive insert type opening is also provided.

Amboman
03-04-2013, 03:12 AM
12 point is correct deleted reference. :cheers:

surlyoldbill
03-04-2013, 02:59 PM
Doing the work myself, I discovered that I could use a tie-down to hold the wrench (with pipe fit over the handle for extension) under tension while I put on the new belt.