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View Full Version : Insulating an '08 144" Cargo Sprinter


Barrelsaver
01-14-2008, 04:07 AM
Has anyone had any experience adding insulation to the sides and ceiling of a cargo van? I'm guessing a flexible sheet of closed cell elastomeric foam, say 1" thick, with PSA peel and stick adhesive would work. However, there may be some other factors to consider that I'm not aware of. Any suggestions please?

kmessinger
01-14-2008, 04:29 AM
When I visited Sportsmobile they were insulating the sides with the normal paper sided fiberglass. Don't know about the ceiling.

Regards,
Keith

Douglas Hicks
01-14-2008, 05:30 AM
Both of my Sprinters are insulated w/the foam. The 2003 was done by a "professional" . Lots of overspray. The 2005 was done by myself & a friend. No oversray, no voids. took about 5 hours. the foam insulates, & lessens the boom of the sheet metal. My cost was $700.00.

I do not know from experience, but have been told fiberglass holds moisture against the sheet metal, leading to rust.

blakej59
01-14-2008, 01:28 PM
I insulated van with the intention of quieting as well as thermal insulation for long haul road trips with comfortable temperature as well as quieting the van.

I insulated with 1/2-inch Dynamat plus Dynaliner Xtreme. I cost me about $1500 in product to cover the entire interior walls, ceiling, inside doors (sliders, rear and front doors) and floor (Dynaliner only under the floorboards). It made a major difference in noise and heating the van in cold northern climate. I also glued carpet to 1/4-inch plywood and screwed it to the walls and ceiling, adding to the sound deadening.

I didn't want a roof mounted A/C unit because of added hieght to an already high vehicle. No rear heat because factory doesn't offer rear heat when you get sliders on both sides. I was concerned about temperature with only front A/C and heat. Heats very good on long trips. Got the van in October so I don't yet know about A/C.

I covered everything first with Dynaliner, then put Dynamat over the top. A roller is most helpful as recommended by manufacturer. Dynamat is a super-efficient thermal insulator and easy to install.

I'm sure there's less expensive means but I knew this was very effective. I purchased from a company on Amazon.com. I originally called the manufacturer and they directed me to amazon as a cheaper place to purchase the quantities I desired.

I've also read in other postings that condensation is a concern. I have some experience with insulating buildings in super cold environments and I just don't think it'll be an issue with the van having this insulation attached to the exterior walls. However, I recognize there are people on this site who have a lot of knowledge and I sure don't wish to start a debate.

I over-purchased and have a few boxes of each left and should sell it if someone wants it.

Happy insulating, Jim

lzcamper
01-14-2008, 11:10 PM
A friend of mine glued styrofoam panels to the ceiling and stuffed the walls with fiberglass batting. I'm trying to put fiberglass batting (JM ComfortTherm - enclosed in plastic with a vapor barrier on one side) in the ceiling as well as the walls. To dampen road noise, I've heard that sticking "patches" of material on the sheet metal will soak up vibrations. Dynamat is way beyond my budget. What do you think of using self-adhesive floor tiles for these "patches"?

Rick

pvsprinter
01-24-2008, 05:06 PM
Google "Sound Destroyer". I bought some and it works really well and at about $100 for 100 square feet the price is right. Install it every where you can and preferably in layers to obtain the best damping of body panels. Then insulate. I used multiple layers of foil faced bubble wrap (Home Depot or Lowes). I installed the mat on as much of the firewall I could to without major trim removal and on the floor under the floor mats on my 06. This really cut engine noise. I may go to the trouble of removing all dash trim at some point because I also have some serious cold air leaksa at the btm left windshield and under steering wheel.

Bob

jdcaples
01-24-2008, 05:14 PM
For additional information: the North American (NCV3) Body Builders Handbook (http://sprinter-source.com/forum/attachment.php?attachmentid=5872&d=1201002939) has manufacturer-guidance for reducing noise in the vehicle interior. The pertinent section is 7.4.3.

-Jon

Shred Head Fred
02-06-2008, 05:32 AM
I'm curious about the spray foam. Since the Dynamat is cost prohibitive for my 170" high roof, is the faom the next best alternative? Would a combination of both make sense?

Sprinter
02-06-2008, 04:14 PM
I'm curious about the spray foam. Since the Dynamat is cost prohibitive for my 170" high roof, is the faom the next best alternative? Would a combination of both make sense?


I used Acoustiblok with great results. I think I spent around $300 (shipping is expensive as this fabric is quite heavy) for my 144" high roof, walls & doors only, no roof
http://www.acoustiblok.com/

OrioN
02-06-2008, 04:37 PM
Hello Shred Head Fred...

Are you looking for Sound or Thermal insulation, or both?

Spray Foam and Dynamat are designed for different aplications....

Jrmorgan
02-06-2008, 08:58 PM
Hi I have a 06, 3500 long box with high roof. After I drove the truck home the noise of the box booming told me I had to do something. I went with the Spay foam, cost me $600.00 plus. Since I had no one to tell me if one kit would do the whole truck from behind the drivers area, back. I tried to use the foam to cover the whole deal. I did plan on putting back all the ordinal wall panels and also to install an aluminum roof panel. My plan was to fill all the voids from the inside of the outside wall to past the ribs and the inner wall areas. What I didn't have and could not find was some machine to flush cut the foam back to the steel. This became a major pain. what became a one or two day job went a week. I am happy with the foam in the end but if you asked me would I do it again, I would have to say not.

If you have a large body like mine you would need two kits, one being the 50 pound and if you could get it a 25 pounder. You have to spray a lot to over fill the areas. Make sure anything you don't want foam on be covered. Inside and out. I learned this the hard way. Very,very hard to clean up the over spray. The one place I didn't foam or insulate was the floor. I would think if you live in the truck, that is one place a lot of cold radiates from. That's my two cents worth!

Shred Head Fred
02-07-2008, 05:31 AM
Im' looking for both. In the northwest we get some cold weather and heat in summer. I'm sure the white exterior paint will help reflect some of the heat. I'm also intrested in midigating some of the road noise and vibration. With foam did you run some sort of conduit for wiring, or just bury it in the foam?

unik
02-08-2008, 01:27 AM
I made;
1.seiling 1inch starfoam +polietilene plastic
2.walls till "windows" botom line 1/4inch starfoam+carpet
3.walls below "windows" first on metal 1/4 star-foam, then above it, house fiber-glass sound/heat/cold R-13 insulation plus 1/8inch playwood and carpet
4.back wheels fenders 1/2inches polipropelene-foam (yogamat) playwood carpet

p.s. I do not have glass-windows,but any way it a "windows" place
p.s.2** pix is from last summer, before I took care of floor insulation
p.s.3***:snore: Now it is more silent inside:snore:

Barrelsaver
02-08-2008, 03:37 AM
jrmorgan's foam insulation job: JR, I'm planning to spray foam insulate my new 144" as soon as I finish the wiring, etc. I wish you would tell us the best method you used for cutting back the over-fill of the foam. I'm not sure what to do about that. :thinking:

OrioN
02-08-2008, 02:35 PM
The best way to cut back the foam is to use a wide blade planer (same o'l woodworking type) with a sharp blade. That it, that's all.... OH!! Wait... I forgot the most important part. The shop vac needs to be present and running in the other hand!

PS... Use painter masking tape on any surface you don't want covered and remove as soon as the foam stops expanding.

Jrmorgan
02-09-2008, 04:56 PM
Barrelsaver I used a power sander to cut back the over-fill. This was connected to a power vac.
I had seen on home improvement shows a device that cut the foam back, it looked like a very light weight lawn mower. I couldn't find something like that to rent in Los Angeles CA. Was a real pain. For the money I don't think I would do it again. Make sure if you do this you cover everything you don't want over spray on, even outside the immediate area outside the doors. The bounce back will end up on your paint and rubber parts!!!! It is very very very hard to clean off!!!!!

nort
02-09-2008, 06:58 PM
We have cut a lot of foam building hovercrafts at the school I teach at. We use a nichrome wire connected to an old model train speed controller. We made a bow out of pvc pipe to stretch the wire with one lead connected to each side of the wire via eye hooks. You can use the metal of the frame to guide the wire and cut it flush. I don't remember the gauge wire we use. I'll check Monday when I go back to school.

Here is a website that describes it in a little more detail.
http://www.nsrca.org/technical/tip_tricks/foam_cutter/foam_cutting_power_supply.htm

unik
02-10-2008, 12:09 PM
All "windows" and walls first I glued 1/4" star-foam.
I did used spray glue.
It is looks like on pix.
Then later I found it needed more insulation.
On ceilling add 3/4" star-foam.

Now I'm in a process of doing somethink with side door:hmmm:

sprintereei
08-18-2008, 02:33 AM
I would be interested in your extra dynamay and insulation materials.
Contact me directly at Sprintereei@gmail.com
Milwaukee, Wis 414 764-7737 CST Call before noon or after 7:00 Pm

sprintereei
08-18-2008, 02:37 AM
I insulated van with the intention of quieting as well as thermal insulation for long haul road trips with comfortable temperature as well as quieting the van.

I insulated with 1/2-inch Dynamat plus Dynaliner Xtreme. I cost me about $1500 in product to cover the entire interior walls, ceiling, inside doors (sliders, rear and front doors) and floor (Dynaliner only under the floorboards). It made a major difference in noise and heating the van in cold northern climate. I also glued carpet to 1/4-inch plywood and screwed it to the walls and ceiling, adding to the sound deadening.

I didn't want a roof mounted A/C unit because of added hieght to an already high vehicle. No rear heat because factory doesn't offer rear heat when you get sliders on both sides. I was concerned about temperature with only front A/C and heat. Heats very good on long trips. Got the van in October so I don't yet know about A/C.

I covered everything first with Dynaliner, then put Dynamat over the top. A roller is most helpful as recommended by manufacturer. Dynamat is a super-efficient thermal insulator and easy to install.

I'm sure there's less expensive means but I knew this was very effective. I purchased from a company on Amazon.com. I originally called the manufacturer and they directed me to amazon as a cheaper place to purchase the quantities I desired.

I've also read in other postings that condensation is a concern. I have some experience with insulating buildings in super cold environments and I just don't think it'll be an issue with the van having this insulation attached to the exterior walls. However, I recognize there are people on this site who have a lot of knowledge and I sure don't wish to start a debate.

I over-purchased and have a few boxes of each left and should sell it if someone wants it.

Happy insulating, Jim




I would be interested in your extra dynamay and insulation materials.
Contact me directly at Sprintereei@gmail.com
Milwaukee, Wis 414 764-7737 CST Call before noon or after 7:00 Pm
sprinteree

pugwash
08-18-2008, 03:22 PM
Most campervan convertors used to use common household rockwool (glassfibre) insulation with a paper vapour barrier nearest the inside of the van. things have moved on as fire proof styrofoam is now on the market and is used for its insulation as well as noise suppression this still has glass fibre inside so protective clothing is still required to save skin irritation. most larger builders merchants can supply it in 8ft x 4ft sheets. any thickness.
your fridges and freezers are all lined with styrofoam.

PS dont use common white house roof tiles these are flammable plus tends to melt after a period with some spray adhesive's.

blakej59
08-21-2008, 12:13 PM
I have some Dynamat and 1/2-inch Dynaliner left over from my Sprinter insulation project.

I insulated the whole interior with Dynamat Extreme. Put 1/2-inch Dynaliner over the top of Dynamat. This is the company's recomended maximum sound and thermal insulating package. Expensive but very effective. When you knock on the outside of the van, it's solid as hitting a bumper or 2X4. I don't have rear air or heat and don't need it in summer or Minnesota winter. It also completely changed the noise level inside.

I over purchased 1 and 2/3 boxes of Dynamat Extreme bulk packs and 2 full boxes of Dynaliner (1/2 inch). The Dynamat originally cost $130/box and the Dynaliner cost $60/box. Cheap it isn't but it's easy to install and it works great. Amazon.com is the cheapest I could find. Even the manufacturer wouldn't come close to Amazon price.

If anyone's interested in my extra Dynamat and Dynaliner, I'll sell the it all for $200 plus frieght from MN. Original cost was $330 plus frieght. Email me at jamesblakeway@hotmail.com

zoeycam
04-24-2010, 09:42 PM
Hi there,

were u able to do the entire cargo area with just under 2 boxes of dynamat extreme?

-Joey

Okie Rick
04-24-2010, 10:44 PM
Take a look at this stuff:

http://www.sprinteraccessories.com/047_insulation_kit.html#


Rick

d_bertko
04-25-2010, 12:13 AM
I used Dow Great Stuff foam in $5 spray cans for thermal insulation of the walls of my DIY. IIRC, I used 48 cans. It proved too difficult to foam the ceiling cavities so I "buttered" rough-cut isocyanurate foam panels with the Great Stuff and then filled in the gaps with it. I'm a whitewater guy and really, really wanted closed cell insulation to prevent moisture migration. This stuff works great for that purpose. The van dries out extremely quickly. The two foams are fire-rated compared to others. And it is night and day difference from my old Econoline as far as lack of musty smell. Still happy after 5 years.

I mostly used a bendy Japanese saw from HD to trim any overfill. A certain amount of labor of love but no problem for amateurs. If I had any more insulation work to do on the house I would have sprung for the contractor air compressor set up instead. The foam is really nice for filling voids. You're essentially protecting the metal skin with a couple of inches of "paint".

My floor takes a lot of abuse and I'm too tall to raise it. I considered insulating from the underside and adding Coroplast covers. But the smallish Espar D2 diesel furnace hasn't the least trouble heating it for winter camping so I stopped adding. My cargo area has a slider window and two more side windows on my 158" long-tall. Definitely easier to heat, more storage area, and less "greenhouse" heating than with windows all around.

I found the Dynamat both expensive and it involved a lot of door disassembly work in the cab. If I were to do it again, I'd have put some kind of acoustical-tuned material over the rear wheelwells as a first layer. I'd think harder about the door work. Maybe make an inch-thick acoustic floor liner and perhaps firewall liner if I were serious about road noise. Most of the rest of the box does not contribute enough noise for me to justify damping all of it with tuned-stuff.

The thermal insulation works pretty well in camp for suppressing outside noise. It reduces road noise but can't do the same low-frequency suppression that tuned material does. Dynamat is aggressively marketed and there are less costly materials used by the mfrs of luxury autos. It's a shame you can't spec it as an option since it would be so much less labor for Mercedes---wrong assembly line!

Unagressive tread (ie highway) tires would be important if you expect low noise at freeway speeds. Gets you noticeably improved mileage since the sound energy comes on your dime.

hkpierce
04-27-2010, 04:59 PM
I used Dow Great Stuff foam in $5 spray cans for thermal insulation of the walls of my DIY. IIRC, I used 48 cans. It proved too difficult to foam the ceiling cavities so I "buttered" rough-cut isocyanurate foam panels with the Great Stuff and then filled in the gaps with it. I'm a whitewater guy and really, really wanted closed cell insulation to prevent moisture migration. This stuff works great for that purpose. The van dries out extremely quickly. .... Still happy after 5 years.


I think the item in red is the best testimony in favor of the applied material mix.

trejos
01-05-2011, 02:13 AM
I am a general contractor and have had icynene spray foam insulation installed in a few older homes. The installers fill the stud bays or wall cavity's with it and let it expand past the studs. They then use a 36" bread knife to cut away the excess insulations using the studs as guides. I am about to insulate a sprinter and purchased 3 of these knifes for $60 (I could not buy a smaller amount) and plan to use them in the same manner. It will not be as smooth as using the studs as guides but I can only imagine the mess caused by a plainer and or sander. Spray foam can achieve an R7 per inch which is the same as rigid foil faced foam boards but this will conform to the space, stop vibrations and becomes a vapor barrier. I have not found another type of insulation that can achieve that high of an R value per inch.