PDA

View Full Version : Tyres - safe or legal?


Boater
02-14-2013, 12:21 AM
Now I'm getting close to getting my van back on the road it's time to think about the tyres.
I have never seen tyres like this before and I'm worried if they are safe to use or even legal - I didn't spot the cracks last summer when I last used it.

Front Left (Kenda)
http://blog.jim-wallis.co.uk/wp-uploads/2013/02/FL.jpg

Rear Left (Hankook)
http://blog.jim-wallis.co.uk/wp-uploads/2013/02/RL.jpg

Front Right (Maxxis)
http://blog.jim-wallis.co.uk/wp-uploads/2013/02/FR.jpg

Rear Right (Maxxis)
http://blog.jim-wallis.co.uk/wp-uploads/2013/02/RR.jpg

Spare (Michelin)
http://blog.jim-wallis.co.uk/wp-uploads/2013/02/Spare.jpg

The spare doesn't have a legal amount of tread on it so is definitely getting changed, I'm hoping rear left is OK to go on it but if I look closely I see fine cracks in it too.

Can someone confirm I am not just paranoid and do need to replace at least 4 of these?

In my understanding of UK law each one is worth 3 penalty points so more than enough there to lose my license, but more importantly blowouts are dangerous. I also don't like having different tyres on the same axle, which is reason enough to change them, but with lower priority.

chads
02-14-2013, 12:34 AM
I don't like weather checked tires either.
Not sure what your local rules are but I generally just change them out if I use the vehicle on a regular basis.
If it's somethng you drive once in a while that's one thing.
But if you are running loaded heavy you may need a couple of tires.
I usually keep the best one for a spare not necessarily just tread depth I look at the casing too.
I recently changed out my trailer tires that looked like that. They don't seem to last too long in that condition.
Chad

flman
02-14-2013, 01:08 AM
I would run them as long as I was not going to travel at high speed, the cracking is only at the outside surface, the inner casing is not cracked or showing any problems now is it? if you have DRW put them on the inside? :shhh: :smirk:

Aqua Puttana
02-14-2013, 01:11 AM
It's difficult to tell from pictures, but...

The real strength is the body and cords of a tire. While the condition of the outer rubber may be indicative of the inside, the two don't necessarily wear or age the same.

It doesn't appear that you have that much tread left so replacement is likely approaching anyway. Why wait? FWIW. vic

P.S. - That last picture looks more like a road damage cut than age to me. :idunno:

david_42
02-14-2013, 01:18 AM
How old are the tires? Some companies recommend changing them if they are over five years old, Michelin's recommendation is 10. It's unfortunate that the two Maxxis are on the same side, as swapping sides with radials isn't recommended.

A brief look at the tyre laws in the UK doesn't show anything about cracking, but if you run heavy loads, I'd say new tires on the rear.

OrioN
02-14-2013, 01:23 AM
... Michelin's recommendation is 10....

incorrect... as it varies with model and can be as low as 5 years.

WPJ
02-14-2013, 01:34 AM
I had tires like this on my dodge, asked my tire guy and he said they are just some light weather cracks nothing to be worried about they will lasst another season or two based on the teared I had...that that with a grain of salt, but this is a place just selling tires and he didn;t try and get me into a new set just yet which is what I asked him when I went to change to these back on.

flman
02-14-2013, 01:40 AM
How old are the tires? Some companies recommend changing them if they are over five years old, Michelin's recommendation is 10.

Sounds like an expiration date to scare old people that drive 1000 miles a year and wussies that want to worry about such trivial stuff? :cry:

I have seen tires much older then that roll. :popcorn:

autostaretx
02-14-2013, 03:58 AM
The problem Boater has is that he's in the UK with stringent DOT inspections.
The casual American approach of "run it 'til it disintegrates" doesn't apply...

--dick

Altered Sprinter
02-14-2013, 04:24 AM
Replace them as soon as possible apart from the cracking the tire is as hard as a rock, you'll lose the van on a wet surface, even at low speed. or get stuck on Grass in full time spin.:laughing:
Find a RV tire that covers hiway and off road. you['ll double your traction/
Richard
50396

50397

.

Boater
02-14-2013, 10:09 AM
Thanks everyone, some food for thought there.

The tread on all the tyres currently touching the ground is 4-5mm, I normally replace at 3mm anyway (legal limit is 1.6mm which the spare has in a few places but we need it all round and over centre 75% of breadth). I have to admit I only spotted that cut on the spare when I looked at the photo - it is the only one I can't see cracking on but that may be because I haven't cleaned all the road muck off.
I think the cracks are too shallow to be a legal problem, and none are longer than the greater of 25mm (1") or 10% of section width (22.5mm) but I think Richards point is good, the rubber does feel hard and I would expect that with ageing/weathering as indicated by the cracks.

On that basis I am going to get 4 new tyres and move the Hankook to the spare because it looks a lot newer than the others and has a bit more tread.

I choose tyres for good wet weather handling, partly because our weather is crap, and partly because as a white water kayaker most of my time in cars (until I got my license and branched out more) has been in the pouring rain looking for rivers!
Richard - thanks for the explanation of RV tyres - I have seen that some here are marked 'Camper' (British word for RV) but hadn't been able to work out the difference.

autostaretx
02-14-2013, 02:40 PM
Richard: aren't those Roadstones a little underrated?
I thought we were supposed to look for 10 ply-rated, not 8
(but that's my fuzzy memory speaking, not an actual dig into the books)

I don't think Roadstones are available in the US market.

--dick (always seeking 15-inch suitable tires)

Boater
02-14-2013, 05:59 PM
Ply rating is mostly irrelvant in the UK, and I guess Oz? The 112/110 load rating is the important bit, more accurate than ply equivalent. I need >= 109 which equates to 1030kg per tyre. I think.
I need to go home and refer to the owners manual to make sure I get the right ratings, some sites are reporting R for the speed rating and some T (can't find any tyres with T), the camper ones I found only have Q which might invalidate my insurance.
I have seen Roadstone on UK sites, so the tyre Richard shows must be available.....

Best options at the moment, based on the new EU tyre label, are looking like Michelin Agilis+ (Agilis camper is only Q for speed, but is M+S rated although marketed for summer) or Uniroyal Rainmax2.
EU label rates 3 properties from A to G or 1 to 3 based on testing: Fuel Economy, Wet Grip, Noise.
Agilis+ and Agilis camper scores best FE=C WG=B N=2
Rainmax2, Vanco2 and a few others score FE=C WG=C N=2
I have been very happy with Uniroyal Rainexpert on my car, and the Rainmax are 20 less than the Agilis, but with RWD the extra might be worth spending.
If only I could find some reliable reviews - only site I found so far had exact same reviews from same contributors for different tyres, hmmmmm!

Picking car tyres is much easier!

Boater
02-15-2013, 02:20 AM
In case anyone else needs to know (and for my own future reference when I forget):

For 3.5t 312D with front axle load up to 1600kg and rear up to 2240kg, the only tyres indicated in the table in the owners manual are:
225/70 R15 C 112/110 R - exactly as Richards photos show!

That means Agilis camper is out for me.
Oh yes, the 195 tyres are rated for other axle load combinations, most have R speed rating but the lightest combi can use a 96 T or 100/98 R, which is presumably why some websites tell me I need T speed rating and others tell me I need 195 wide tyres.....

Jim

Altered Sprinter
02-15-2013, 02:41 AM
Richard: aren't those Roadstones a little underrated?
I thought we were supposed to look for 10 ply-rated, not 8
(but that's my fuzzy memory speaking, not an actual dig into the books)

I don't think Roadstones are available in the US market.

--dick (always seeking 15-inch suitable tires) Dick the Roadstone South Korean are above Mercedes specification's I have a 3 series van
The Roadstones work perfectly off road , exceptionally well ,however not as good as the OEM Bridgestones on a dry hiway just a tad nosier.
But they are 100%plus legal.
8 ply is the specification for 15 inch rims 110 minimum.
Mine had done what Boaters had but cracked on the inside of the tread, not worn out but just became hard with age and thus were dangerous in the wet.
A bridgestone tire is over 300 dollars Roadstone half the price same quality.
Richard

geoffs
02-15-2013, 03:02 AM
At Richard's recommendation, I'll be getting a set of the Roadstone tyres 'soon'. Mine still have plenty of tread on them and don't appear to be hard but are old - probably original.

It might be new brakes first though, or perhaps replace the dead gloplug. Decisions, decisions, :thinking:

Altered Sprinter
02-15-2013, 03:22 AM
Tires or brakes one will follow the other, the glow plugs been dead for so long... well it's probably welded itself to the head by now.:rolleyes:
Decisions decisions love that one Geoff.:thumbup:
Cheers Richard Back to jam making.
50408

50409
:popcorn:

flman
02-15-2013, 11:15 AM
My T1N has 8 or 9 YO Michelin's on the front axle, they are knee deep in rubber and no expiration date. :tongue:

Altered Sprinter
02-15-2013, 11:19 AM
My T1N has 8 or 9 YO Michelin's on the front axle, they are knee deep in rubber and no expiration date. :tongue: Do some hard yakka on a hot summers day, and watch them grow old.:tongue:

flman
02-15-2013, 11:24 AM
Do some hard yakka on a hot summers day, and watch them grow old.:tongue:

That is perfect then, Cause my T1N rust bucket is the winter van, and it wont be seeing any hard yakka on the hot summers days. :thumbup: