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briggie
02-13-2013, 08:03 PM
Does anyone know which bolts I remove to get the oil cooler off to clean it. I read on here other posts but was looking for pictures of the process. I tried to take some out but they were very hard to get at. So I don't think I am removing the right ones The oil cooler on the side not the one under the turbo

suzieque
02-13-2013, 09:42 PM
I don't think its possible to remove the engine oil cooler and clean it - at least not easily without a good mechanical capability.

Here is a picture of the oil cooler mounted on my OM642 engine. I tried to clean mine yesterday by sneaking the end of the car wash power washer underneath my radiator hose and spraying for about 60 seconds on soapy rinse. I'm not saying this is the recommended way to clean it, it just happens to be only way I could think of without disassembling my engine to get at it.

CJPJ
02-13-2013, 10:24 PM
I'm guessing , EGR cooler cleaning.

from PLUMMER

http://sprinter-source.com/forum/showthread.php?t=21722&highlight=egr+cooler

http://s1222.photobucket.com/albums/dd497/PLUMMER47/SPRINTER%202007%20SERVICE/

jdcaples
02-14-2013, 12:18 AM
I should preface this with this fact: the original poster, briggie is on my ignore list. I'm not going to view his/her posting.

I will contribute to the thread because suzieque and CJPJ both contributed, both are more helpful than deceptive and neither need to go out of their way to contribute copyrighted material to the forum.

50389

The fasteners are identified in the above PDF, as well as the service manual guidance for removing the oil cooler. I don't know what the original poster has in mind when describing the oil cooler, but this should remove all doubt about what's required.

Installation information including torque specs.

50390



-Jon

flman
02-14-2013, 01:15 AM
For what reason would it need cleaning, the oil is filtered right? Synthetic oil and proper anti freeze should not cause a build up the would cause blockage or impeded heat exchange now would it? Just wondering what brought you to doing this?

suzieque
02-14-2013, 01:55 AM
The only time the oil cooler I identified normally requires cleaning is when there is a problem with the fuel filter and diesel has leaked down where the oil cooler is located. I would not normally think the internal area of the oil cooler needs cleaning.

flman
02-14-2013, 02:06 AM
The only time the oil cooler I identified normally requires cleaning is when there is a problem with the fuel filter and diesel has leaked down where the oil cooler is located. I would not normally think the internal area of the oil cooler needs cleaning.

So that is oil to air heat exchange?

suzieque
02-14-2013, 02:41 AM
The fins on the oil cooler are quite close together. Diesel fuel, when spilled, does not evaporate like gasoline, rather it attracts dirt dust that further restrict air from flowing through the oil cooler fins. Flooding the area with hot soapy water should breakup the diesel and allow it to wash away. That's my theory anyway :)

jdcaples
02-14-2013, 03:42 AM
I can't imagine why the staked plate engine oil cooler would need cleaning if recommended engine oils and coolant are used and cycled at recommended intervals.

I'd imagine the emission system or cooling system would fail long before the engine oil cooler would be fouled with sediment or corroded to the point where cleaning would be required.



-Jon

suzieque
02-14-2013, 03:55 AM
I can't imagine why the staked plate engine oil cooler would need cleaning if recommended engine oils and coolant are used and cycled at recommended intervals.

I'd imagine the emission system or cooling system would fail long before the engine oil cooler would be fouled with sediment or corroded to the point where cleaning would be required.



-Jon

yup, agreed jon, the I've never read of a well maintained om642 oil cooler requiring internal cleaning.

I do recall watching a show about Ford Powerstroke diesel oil coolers clogging up. I cannot recall the exact circumstance, could've been related to water getting into the coolant due to an EGR failure and then clogging the oil cooler.
Therefore I suppose water or coolant in your oil could cause the oil cooler to clog, not sure just speculating. :)

flman
02-14-2013, 10:58 AM
So that is oil to air heat exchange?

BUMP?

I keep hearing air, oil, antifreeze, so how is this thing cooled, and why wash it if it has anti freeze, except for engine cleanliness?

Aqua Puttana
02-14-2013, 12:25 PM
BUMP?

I keep hearing air, oil, antifreeze, so how is this thing cooled, and why wash it if it has anti freeze, except for engine cleanliness?
Yep. I have no experience with this particular oil cooler. I do have experience with other types of oil coolers related to maintenance, and assembling coolers for tanks and submarines.

The descriptions Jon provided for R&R clearly indicate that the antifreeze is the heat exchange medium for the oil. That cooler doesn't depend upon air over the unit for cooling (and warming?) the oil. The flat surface in the picture has no fins, and it is located in a basically dead, warm space of the engine so air circulation is minimal.

I wouldn't screw with it. Whatever cleaning methods you use are likely to leave residue which could cause other problems with corrosion such as siezing dissimilar metal fasteners into the aluminum threads. My opinion and worth everything you'll never pay for it. vic

jdcaples
02-14-2013, 12:34 PM
BUMP?

I keep hearing air, oil, antifreeze, so how is this thing cooled, and why wash it if it has anti freeze, except for engine cleanliness?

Engine oil and engine coolant circulate through the stacked plate oil cooler. I think it's probably more of a temperature regulator than "a cooler." When the oil's hotter, it heats coolant and when the coolant's hotter, the oil cools the antifreeze.

There are pictures here: http://sprinter-source.com/forum/showthread.php?t=11326

I have a spare one because I wanted to know how it worked. I bought it before my Sprinter arrived. There are dedicated passages. I deduced this by plugging a whole, blew into one remaining open hole and no air came out. I blew into the next hole and air came out the opposite, unplugged hole. I don't know which passage is for coolant circulation and which passage is for oil circulation, but they are dedicated paths with no cross contamination path if the assembly is intact.

That's all I know, flman.

-Jon

dubyajayes
02-14-2013, 04:19 PM
Great posts on the oil cooler. I bought my Dodge Sprinter 3500 used, had about 45K on it and the oil was filthy. I drained the oil/removed the filter. I then filled the crankcase with 3 gals of kerosene, let it stand for a few hours, then just nudged the starter to turn over the engine a rev or 2. Let it stand a few more hours then drained the kero. After it drained, I used a coat hanger wire wrapped with a cotton cloth strip to sop up any remaining oil/kero in the oil pan, via the oil drain plug. When the strips showed no more oil/kero, I put in about .5qt of Walmart synthetic (it is cheap), and let that drain thoroughly. Then added the Mobil1ESP MB formual synthetic. After driving 2K+ miles, the oil still looks good, somewhat dark but doesn't look like "gunk". I have 65K on it now, and I am hoping this method keeps my oil system and cooler somewhat clean and functioning properly.
walt

flman
02-14-2013, 06:20 PM
Engine oil and engine coolant circulate through the stacked plate oil cooler. I think it's probably more of a temperature regulator than "a cooler." When the oil's hotter, it heats coolant and when the coolant's hotter, the oil cools the antifreeze.

There are pictures here: http://sprinter-source.com/forum/showthread.php?t=11326

I have a spare one because I wanted to know how it worked. I bought it before my Sprinter arrived. There are dedicated passages. I deduced this by plugging a whole, blew into one remaining open hole and no air came out. I blew into the next hole and air came out the opposite, unplugged hole. I don't know which passage is for coolant circulation and which passage is for oil circulation, but they are dedicated paths with no cross contamination path if the assembly is intact.

That's all I know, flman.

-Jon

Thanks Jon, it is starting to sound like an educated eggucator to quote Willy Wonka.

So it is like a water cooled condenser we use for refrigeration, water on one side, refrigerant on the other, a heat exchanger, makes the most sense that it is to stabilize the temps between oil and coolant for quick warm up and emissions reasons?

Makes me wonder why exterior cleaning would be so critical at all, but we all like to work on a clean engine any ways, don't we?

jdcaples
02-14-2013, 07:03 PM
Makes me wonder why exterior cleaning would be so critical at all, but we all like to work on a clean engine any ways, don't we?

My engine is cleaner the Bruce's (bblessing) engine. That's all that really matters to me.

Ok, that's not true. You're right. No one wants to work in filth.

My dad owned a front-end alignment and brake shop from '70 until '88 or so. I observed that clean under carriages also got a little more technician effort than filthy ones.... ownership pride seems to translate, a lot of the time, to pride in workmanship.

So yeah, it's not critical, but it could be the difference between noticing a bad glow plug connection and


just wanting to finish changing the fuel filter to get that stinking pile of diesel 'n dirt outa my face. If it wasn't so filthy in here, I'd probably check to see if that turbo charger inlet seal ring's split like all of 'em did back when this thing was built. Screw it. I'm going to lunch"


SeeWhutEyeMeen?

:)

-Jon

flman
02-14-2013, 10:30 PM
My engine is cleaner the Bruce's (bblessing) engine. That's all that really matters to me.

Ok, that's not true. You're right. No one wants to work in filth.

My dad owned a front-end alignment and brake shop from '70 until '88 or so. I observed that clean under carriages also got a little more technician effort than filthy ones.... ownership pride seems to translate, a lot of the time, to pride in workmanship.


-Jon

That is true in all the trades I guess, if I have to kick my way in, and kick my way out, you are just getting a good enough job. :shhh:

briggie
02-14-2013, 11:04 PM
I meant to say egr cooler. But I could not change the heading after listed

briggie
02-14-2013, 11:05 PM
I can't imagine why the staked plate engine oil cooler would need cleaning if recommended engine oils and coolant are used and cycled at recommended intervals.

I'd imagine the emission system or cooling system would fail long before the engine oil cooler would be fouled with sediment or corroded to the point where cleaning would be required.



-Jon

I ment to say egr cooler

Old Crows
02-14-2013, 11:46 PM
I meant to say egr cooler. But I could not change the heading after listed

Oops!

flman
02-15-2013, 01:18 AM
I ment to say egr cooler

LOL, if nothing else we got a good education on the oil cooler out of this?

Plummer has a good write up over in NCV3 write up BTW.

briggie
02-15-2013, 01:32 AM
LOL, if nothing else we got a good education on the oil cooler out of this?

Plummer has a good write up over in NCV3 write up BTW.

lol i see that

suzieque
02-15-2013, 06:09 PM
here is what a dirty intercooler looks like (on the outside) when it has diesel fuel spilled on it. This view shows how the "plates" are stacked.

PLUMMER
02-15-2013, 06:34 PM
Jon is on the right track with the flate plate description, but in no way is that a cooler. It's a heat exchanger. A cooler will have fins in the automotive application. This flat plate exchanger is there to maintain a specific delta Temp between the 2 medium. My GUESS would be control of turbo oil temps, or quicker coolant temp rise.

Isn't there a cooler of some sort that is u shaped and located in the radiator area with fins, for power steering fluid?? That's where I would expect to find an actual "oil cooler".

Cleaning that plate exchanger is easy with the Krud Kutter and low pressure water. It literally dissolved that kinda grime easily and then hosed off with warm to hot water. An air hose will push most or all the puddles out. I've seen some serious damage result from pressure washers, no sealed device is safe with those.

talkinghorse43
02-17-2013, 02:02 PM
Of course, the heat exchanger in question will either heat or cool the engine oil depending on the current temperatures of engine coolant and engine oil. But, the main purpose of this heat exchanger is to extract heat from the engine oil (cooling) when the engine is operating under highly-loaded conditions. These engines are fitted with oil spray nozzles pointing to the back of each piston and oil from them keeps the pistons from "burning" under highly-loaded conditions. Oil cooling could be done with air, but that would require much more surface area, as well as piping (subject to leaks) to get the oil to the front of the vehicle and return (my son's '87 MB 190D 2.5 turbo sedan has this setup - also sodium filled valves). More surface area because air/liquid overall heat transfer coefficients are much lower than with liquid/liquid heat exchangers.