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Missouri Blue
02-04-2013, 02:22 AM
I changed the ATF fluid today. It had been changed by the PO at 76,000 miles and the van now has 175,000 so it was due. Everything went very smooth thanks to Sikwan and others who have have provided great write-up/info. (I didn't have the right size socket to rotate the engine and the torque converter drain plug was not visible so I started up the van and thankfully when I turned it off the plug was dead center looking right back at me!...I can't believe it only took one try) I decided, per Dr. A.'s recommendation to change the transmission adapter plug housing as well. The old one came out without a problem, the lower o-ring fell off as it came out. I rubbed some ATF on the new one and pushed it in... I used a mallet and wood to tap it in all the way. I put my 7mm socket (with paper towels shoved inside) onto the bolt and and tightened it down... BUT THE BOLT JUST KEPT SPINNING... it never tightened. I tried to pry the new plug out but I couldn't without fear of breaking it. I plugged the electrical connector back in, locked it in place and took it for a test drive. Wow, what a difference in shifting... so much smoother.

What should I do about the plug housing bolt not fastening? Should I be worried that the whole housing and electrical connector will work loose? Any suggestions or gained knowledge from a similar experience would be greatly appreciated.

(This forum has saved me $1000's of dollars in the first 3 months of ownership... though I am hoping the savings slow down a little bit.)

John

mean_in_green
02-04-2013, 11:18 AM
My apology if it seems too obvious to say but is it fully home? I seem to remember reading that the connecter can be awkward to fully locate.

Missouri Blue
02-04-2013, 11:21 AM
Fair enough question... I think it is fully seated as I tapped it with a mallet and it is in as far as the old housing.

Aqua Puttana
02-04-2013, 01:43 PM
Fair enough question... I think it is fully seated as I tapped it with a mallet and it is in as far as the old housing.
I would be nervous to run if I knew that the connector bolt wasn't holding the body into place. There isn't much pressure on the body, but should it pop loose and you lose the fill then it could make for a bad day. I would wedge it somehow in an emergency, but you don't sound desperate at this point. :idunno:

There is some discussion here which may help.


http://sprinter-source.com/forum/showthread.php?t=18870

I know that there are some pictures somewhere here that show the what the connector looks like when it is properly seated. Maybe in the transmission fluid change Write-up? Too many pages there for me to search.

The body needs to be properly seated before the bolt is snugged up. The threaded boss is just basically attached to the circuit board. If the connector body isn't fully seated and you try to use the bolt to bring it home the threaded part can pull loose. (edit: or aother bad things may happen per Doktor A.) Don't overtighten the bolt. The seals hold the fluid in and do their job regardless of how tight the bolt is. The bolt just holds the connector body in proper position. Sorry I can't offer more. vic

Missouri Blue
02-06-2013, 01:19 AM
Well-- I sheared the small 7mm bolt off in the socket! I had read the 22in lb. instruction by Dr. A and was going real easy, but evidently not easy enough. I wedge my head up into a slot where I could look in the transmission electrical hole and saw the damage. I tried everything to get that 1/2 bolt out... it is sticking out about 1.5mm (of course I'm guessing based on feel). But I could not get it to budge. So I stuck a dab of JB Weld (very small amount because I did not want it to get on any of the electrical pins in the socket) on the end of the shear off bolt on the Adapter Plug Housing and put it back in. Then I plugged in the electrical connection and used two long zip ties to make sure that it will not work its way out. Took it for a drive and no problems... so I'll live with this until the weather warms up and then I'll try again to remove the broken bolt... (maybe the JB weld will stick and the whole bolt will come out... yeah right!)

hulagun
02-06-2013, 07:45 AM
I just replaced mine today too! Wish I had seen this thread before tonight... :hmmm:

Like the OP, I made sure the new adapter was clean and the o-rings lightly lubed before installation. Worried about screwing up, I took care to ensure the new adapter lined up on the pins correctly (rotating it back and forth until it dropped inward a few mm). I didnt want to have to whack it in with anything because that might cause unseen damage. Since I had good leverage lying on the ground under my van, I just pushed gave it a firm shove with both hands. It went in even more.

Turning the 7mm hex center keeper bolt did draw it in yet another 1-2 mm. At that point, everything seemed to snug up and look good. I did not realize there was a torque spec :wtf:: (did someone say 22 inch/lbs?) but luckily I stopped tightening when it got scary. It's still pretty snug! Hopefully this did not distort the circuit board...

abittenbinder
02-06-2013, 06:57 PM
I did not realize there was a torque spec :wtf:: (did someone say 22 inch/lbs?) but luckily I stopped tightening when it got scary. It's still pretty snug! Hopefully this did not distort the circuit board...

I would recommend less the 12 in/lbs.

Distortion is not the risk here, stripping the outer anchor splines of the threaded rivet nut or seizing the screw in place for the next swap is the big risk.

Doktor A

Missouri Blue
02-07-2013, 02:04 AM
I do not intend to "name drop" Dr. A's name as proof for why I didn't doing anything wrong or to excuse myself from just making up the torque spec. I was referring to a post found here http://sprinter-source.com/forum/showthread.php?t=2815 (and below) ... Nevertheless, if I ever get that broken bolt out I'll use less force (like 12 in/lbs.) on the next one.


Use ATF to lube the new O-rings -also lube the exterior of the new socket and carefully align the 3 indexing slots. They will assure subsequent correct alignment of the delicate elec pins within the socket holes. Once the slots are aligned exert pressure (don't worry you won't harm it) on the socket's outer end - the o-rings will compress and the socket will "pop" into position. Make certain its fully seated then tighten the small bolt to correct torque. Using a stubby 1/4" drive wrench w/7mm socket- only about 22 in./lbs. is sufficient (gentle hand torque-if you lack a small torque wrench). Doktor A

flman
02-07-2013, 10:53 AM
I did not need no hammer to seat mine, it went in easy, but it was last summer, and I do not recall how tight I made the bolt?

Aqua Puttana
02-07-2013, 12:17 PM
I did not need no hammer to seat mine, it went in easy, but it was last summer, and I do not recall how tight I made the bolt?
Not to kick anyone while they're down...

I don't need no stinkin' torque wrench... most of the time. I rarely do need one except for things like cylinder heads, glow plugs, injector hold down bolts, rear end crush seals, or other more critical fastener applications.

Before tightening anything I consider the size of the fastener and what it is doing. With things like the transmission pan bolts (which lock up to a stop position), oil filter cap, transmission body connector, and many other items invlolving seals, the fastener needs to be tight enough to hold position and never come loose. When compressed seals (transmission pan) or O-ring seals (oil filter cap) are in the mix then those seals provide tension and resistance so rattling loose is highly unlikely. Things like oil pan plugs need to be tight enough... if you err on the low side and notice a drip, then snug it a bit. Tighter than needed is not better.

A trick I learned for installing spark plugs and other things where I might be tempted to overdo it is to grasp my 3/8" rachet handle fist like over the top of the rachet mechanism. I feel that gives more consistent feel as to force applied and limits the amount of torque available as compared to grabbing the end of the handle in different arm and hand orientations. Of course that method also depends upon your strength.

If I broke that transmission bolt off I would definitely be unhappy to say the least. I said earlier that I would wedge it or stablize it in an emergency. Were I in your present situation with a broken bolt, and I had sufficiently stablilized the connector body from coming out, I would just monitor the situation to be certain everything stays in place and wait until the next fluid change. There is no system pressure on the connector body other than the fluid level. The transmission is vented. The O-rings seals do their job as long as the connector body maintains position.

If you used white cable ties I would change them over to black colored type. The white cable ties have more a tendency to get brittle with age.

My opinion and worth everything you'll never pay for it. I'm quite certain that you'll be fine. vic

Missouri Blue
02-07-2013, 02:07 PM
Thanks Vic,

I too think its going to be ok... I'm planning a trip to Dr. A this summer, maybe we can pull out the electrical components of the transmission, inspect, and remove this bolt then.

I seated the plug without a problem, that's what is so crazy, I spun the bolt and it evidently went from loose to broke without any warning... I know this seems hard to believe.

Regarding the torque wrench... I have never used a torque wrench before owning a Sprinter, I'm so nervous about breaking things (which I evidently have reason to be nervous) that I am trying to follow instructions as well as I can... I should not abandon common sense.

flman
02-08-2013, 12:35 PM
Not to kick anyone while they're down...

I don't need no stinkin' torque wrench... most of the time. I rarely do need one except for things like cylinder heads, glow plugs, injector hold down bolts, rear end crush seals, or other more critical fastener applications.



I am not all scientific either, if it needs to be tight, I grunt some more, if it looks like a wimpy bolt be careful. X2 torque wrench for critical applications.