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Jrmorgan
01-19-2013, 12:24 AM
Anyone have thoughts on Evans waterless coolant?

piper1
01-19-2013, 01:24 AM
It's nice stuff for a race engine or if you are making mods for fuel economy that will result in higher water temps. It is gaining a small following in the trucking industry as it allows you to raise the temperature that the radiator fan cuts in saving fuel (it takes 60 to 90 HP to turn a big trucks cooling fan). It also turns to a jelly like substance when very cold but does not expand (like frozen coolant) and re liquifies when warmed up. It is basically propylene glycol and it won't boil inside an engine like regular coolant can in very hotspot area's. (hence it's safe to raise temps)

As far as it being a replacement coolant (if you are not doing any mods) I wouldn't use it. It actually conducts heat worse than a proper mix of conventional ethylene glycol/water coolant mixes and you stand a good chance of raising you coolant temps.

Jrmorgan
01-19-2013, 05:00 AM
OK so I am slow, I just read the Owners' manual. I couldn't believe what I am reading. "Have the coolant renewed every 15 years or 100,000 miles"??????? WOW Do the hoses last that long?

Holy :censored:!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Aqua Puttana
01-19-2013, 12:30 PM
OK so I am slow, I just read the Owners' manual. I couldn't believe what I am reading. "Have the coolant renewed every 15 years or 100,000 miles"??????? WOW Do the hoses last that long?

Holy :censored:!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
The hoses probably have a good chance of lasting that long. At least my T1N Sprinter diesel seems to run generally cooler than any of my gasser engines. Heat is probably your biggest enemy. Gas engine hoses often seem to fail at the engine connection nipples where the heat is highest. For the record, I'm not recommending that you don't change your coolant and the hoses more frequently. I believe Mother Mercedes has shortened the coolant change interval as they did the transmission fluid schedule, but check that because I'm not 100% on it.

Isn't there a safety reason for using other than glycol based coolant in racing cars too? They don't want slippery stuff ending up on the track. As with so many of these racing related methods the reasons they are used don't necessarily transfer over to daily driving in spite of any marketing literature that you may read.

I recall Doktor A commenting that special brake hoses which are used for racing are not a good idea because they don't have longevity and require frequent inspection. Not a problem with racing, but can be with daily drivers. There are other examples. Do enough research before you jump in. Have fun. vic

Jrmorgan
01-19-2013, 04:40 PM
Transmission check at 80,000 miles Holy Batman!

SD26
10-12-2018, 04:26 PM
I've used quite a bit of the Evans product. For sometime, they have had a propylene and ethylene glycol mix (still no water) that is different from the straight PG mix. For some racing motorcycles, I've just used RV PG as coolant, where allowed as some organizations don't allow PG in whole or partial in the coolant.

In my big Ford bus with a 7.3PSD, I used the Evans PG/EG (which has some specific designation from Evans). I pulled a 18ft and then 24ft enclosed auto hauler all over.

My temperatures were not elevated as I saw with their straight PG product.

On the road advantage:

The boiling points for the Evans product is over 300*F under zero pressure. When you have to drive 600 miles overnight, and a pinhole lead occurs in some part of the cooling system, you can just remove the radiator or degas bottle cap to eliminate pressure in the cooling system. Since the boiling point is so high, it doesn't expand and push out of everything. With zero pressure, the squirting of coolant from a hose or other leak is a dribble. Or it might stop.

I always thought that, because there is no water in the system, I had much, much better longevity to my hoses. Water can always be a producer of problems.

Have just put my T1N into service for myself, so I'm trying to weigh if I'm going to do the Evans PG/EG mix.

Bobnoxious
10-12-2018, 04:55 PM
Personally, I would not, under any circumstances, deviate from MB specifications. Especially fluids.

SD26
10-13-2018, 12:11 AM
I'm quite a "couple" miles outside of warranty.

I've deviated from specifications for Yamaha, Suzuki, Kawasaki, VW, and quite a number of Fords.

Bobnoxious
10-13-2018, 12:26 AM
I'm quite a "couple" miles outside of warranty.

I've deviated from specifications for Yamaha, Suzuki, Kawasaki, VW, and quite a number of Fords.

And, I as well. However, a Sprinter, merely because of it German origin, is what I am fond of calling a "Special needs" vehicle, as are all German vehicles, but especially quirky Benz. Devil is in the details and comptemplate actions wisely.

SD26
10-13-2018, 12:33 AM
And, I as well. However, a Sprinter, merely because of it German origin, is what I am fond of calling a "Special needs" vehicle, as are all German vehicles, but especially quirky Benz. Devil is in the details and comptemplate actions wisely.

Similarly, my VW TDI's were German and quite spec-ed out by the manufacture: Special needs. (I like that. :cheers:)