PDA

View Full Version : My Power Loss Experience


jjrubino
01-14-2013, 04:19 PM
I have read the threads on power loss, and I'm hoping to get some opinions on my power loss problem. Based upon my review of previous posts, it seems to be the turbo turning off. If I turn the van off for a while, it returns to normal, but I have to turn it off more than a couple of minutes.

My power loss has come after long drives - about 800 miles or so. During these drives, my wife and I have not turned the van off at all - even during fuel stops. The power loss came during hard acceleration. In two cases, it came back quickly but the Check Engine light stayed on. In the latest incident, the power did not come back until after I turned the van off for a while once I got home.

The first time it happened, I took it to my mechanic. He could not find anything wrong (he works on Fedex sprinters) and reset the engine light. Now, I am far from my mechanic.

Any advice will be helpful.

jmoller99
01-14-2013, 06:05 PM
What year Sprinter? Please add this information in your user profile, along with what city/state you are in - it will save us from asking everytime.

This situation may not throw any errors. Depending on the year your Sprinter is, there are different things to look for. Your Turbo is being turned off by the onboard ECU - there is nothing wrong with the Turbo itself.

jjrubino
01-14-2013, 06:20 PM
2006 2500

jmoller99
01-14-2013, 06:52 PM
When did you last change your fuel filter? You might have an air leak in the turbo hoses or the turbo resonator (if you are running the original ones - these are highly suspect).

If you have a ScanGuage II or UltraGuage EM - what is your intake air temp compared to the ambient air temp. What is the highest boost pressure you see as well as the MAP pressure?

Again - please update your profile.

autostaretx
01-14-2013, 07:08 PM
The power loss came during hard acceleration. I
Jmoller99's suggeestion is a good one... but your symptoms would also match an air leak in the piping/plumbing/parts between the turbo and the intake manifold.
Those include the plastic Turbo Resonator (renowned for heavy-load leakage... like mine did), the hose between it and the intercooler (sandwiched with the radiator), the aluminum intercooler itself, and the complex hose assembly between the intercooler and the intake manifold.

A sticky actuator on the turbo can also cause it, simply because it only reaches maximum extension (or contraction) under the heaviest loads.

Having the codes read is required to see what the Sprinter thinks about it.. (but it'll probably just say "underboost" )

The IAT (Intake Air Temp) probably wouldn't be load-related (in terms of being triggered by a heavy load), but if it's reading abnormally high, then it could contribute to the "takes longer to clear up" issue.

Now, I am far from my mechanic.
Well, where are you? There might be a well-equipped (diagnostically) forum member near you.

--dick

jjrubino
01-14-2013, 07:38 PM
Thanks, everyone. I am in Fernandina Beach, FL, which is north of Jacksonville. My Sprinter is a 2005/6 RV by Leisure Travel Vans. It has 69K on it.

jmoller99
01-15-2013, 07:26 PM
P codes:

The next thing that would be useful is to get a list of P codes from an ODBII reader (the plug in port is near the drivers left knee while sitting in the drivers seat [NAFTA]). While it would be best to use a Sprinter friendly unit (one that can read all of the data), even a generic one may give us some error codes to work with.

If you drop in at an auto parts store, some of them will read your P Codes for free. If you do this, please post not only the P-Code number , but also the text message that shows up. There are a lot of codes that won't make a check engine light come on. NOTE: don't clear these values if read from a Generic ODBII reader - you may need to have them read on a Sprinter compatible reader later.

You could have a partially clogged EGR or some sensor that is out of tolerance.


Lube the Actuator:

In the mean time, get some high temp lubricant (like a ceramic grease - something that can take the heat of being applied to an exhaust system), remove the cover on the left side of the engine (where the turbocharger is directly underneath) and apply lube directly to the actuator arm on the turbo -you will not need very much grease. There are 3 10mm bolts/nuts holding the cover on. Check the turbo hoses and turbo resonator while you have access to them. Replace the cover when done.

jjrubino
01-16-2013, 03:29 PM
Thanks for the great information! I have it at a mechanic now for a diagnostic, though I do not consider them Sprinter experts. They are changing the fuel filter, too. I will definitely lubricate the actuator and check the hoses.

jjrubino
01-19-2013, 01:30 PM
UPDATE: My mechanic said that he was getting a code for low fuel pressure. He changed the fuel filter. He believes it was the original and said it was likely clogged based upon what he found in it. I actually think that the van is a bit faster off the line now, but it could be my imagination!

So, we'll see how it plays out. I ordered some ceramic grease and will lube the turbo actuator, as well.

drmoreau
01-20-2013, 01:27 AM
UPDATE: My mechanic said that he was getting a code for low fuel pressure. He changed the fuel filter. He believes it was the original and said it was likely clogged based upon what he found in it. I actually think that the van is a bit faster off the line now, but it could be my imagination!

So, we'll see how it plays out. I ordered some ceramic grease and will lube the turbo actuator, as well.


69K is about 4x longer than one should run a fuel filter without change. Poor maintenance usually leads to lousy performance. Or at least that is what my wife tells me when she kicks me out the door to get some exercise! :clapping: