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katmat
01-12-2013, 03:02 AM
Looking to see if anyone else has had my problem. I just ordered my 3rd block heater from Europarts in 5 years. The heaters work for a year or two & then the element seems to burn out.
Thanks,
Matt Murphy

flman
01-23-2013, 08:06 PM
I am still on my original 05 heater, but hardly ever use it. Used it last night due to a good drop in NE temps. Did you happen to note the wattage of the heater? They do not seem to put out very much heat compared to the block heater in my old Econoline diesel. I know it is working as I listened for the arc in the plug on connect. It must be on of those German Uber efficient designs, just enough to aid in starting with very little excess heat?

katmat
01-24-2013, 02:04 PM
I am still on my original 05 heater, but hardly ever use it. Used it last night due to a good drop in NE temps. Did you happen to note the wattage of the heater? They do not seem to put out very much heat compared to the block heater in my old Econoline diesel. I know it is working as I listened for the arc in the plug on connect. It must be on of those German Uber efficient designs, just enough to aid in starting with very little excess heat?

I think that these heaters are 500 watt rated.

Aqua Puttana
01-24-2013, 02:35 PM
... I know it is working as I listened for the arc in the plug on connect. ...
The load of the heater element is enough to cause a loading spark. IF there is an associated electrical circulation pump needed and it is not operating then the heat from the element will not be properly distributed. FWIW. vic

flman
01-24-2013, 08:17 PM
I think that these heaters are 500 watt rated.

The Econolines were rated 1000 watts, and you could here them boil like a coffee make when you first plugged them in. When you went out to start it in the morning, it started like the engine was just driven and switched off. :thumbup:

The load of the heater element is enough to cause a loading spark. IF there is an associated electrical circulation pump needed and it is not operating then the heat from the element will not be properly distributed. FWIW. vic

I am going to connect mine and put an amp meter on it later, to see what it drawers.

katmat
01-24-2013, 08:36 PM
I installed the 3rd one last week. Here in Chicago the night time temp has been near 0(F).
Van starts fine.

NelsonSprinter
01-24-2013, 08:53 PM
FWIW: The more efficient use of the block heater is to have a HD outdoor timer set up to come on 2 hours before startup, not to have it going all night and morning. Save you lost heat and lost $$. And only use when the overnight temp is expected to be below -10C or + 15F, your 5W40 oil and glow plugs are great above that temp

flman
01-24-2013, 10:23 PM
FWIW: The more efficient use of the block heater is to have a HD outdoor timer set up to come on 2 hours before startup, not to have it going all night and morning. Save you lost heat and lost $$. And only use when the overnight temp is expected to be below -10C or + 15F, your 5W40 oil and glow plugs are great above that temp

Been there done that with the old Navistar mechanical injection diesel.

I got zero amps on my T1N block heater, and no continuity? Oh well, she starts just fine so far at 0F.

Aqua Puttana
01-24-2013, 11:03 PM
...
Oh well, she starts just fine so far at 0F.
I'm not surprised. As I said in another thread, I think that there are advantages to starting with warm(er) oil from an oil pan heater, but it should not be necessary to need any heater for low temperatures until it gets extremely low. What's extremely low?? Based upon my limited experience, given a decent engine, edit: good battery, good glow plugs, proper viscosity oil, and good fuel you're OK to at least -10F for reliable starting. :2cents: vic

Missouri Blue
01-25-2013, 12:07 AM
My dash read 4F this morning and it started right up... The glow plug light was probably on for 8 seconds before I started it.

jackbombay
01-25-2013, 12:14 AM
Based upon my limited experience, given a decent engine, edit: good battery, good glow plugs, proper viscosity oil, and good fuel you're OK to at least -10F for reliable starting. :2cents: vic

My T1N starts very well in cold weather, at zero degrees F it fires up just fine and idles very smooth. IF I were to drive it regularly in the winter I would install a block heater though. I also live at high altitude which makes a notable difference in how hard it is for the van to start in cold weather as there is %20 less air to compress up here compared to sea level, less air being compressed results in the compressed air not getting heated as much when the fuel does get injected.

I have had good luck with a zero start 1000 watt heater on my VW, you would have to figure out how to install it on the sprinter though. The freeze plug type heaters are just not that long lasting, I have friends that use them and it seems they break once a year or so...

Oilburner
01-25-2013, 12:44 AM
I have heater installed ,500 watts, 3 years and I use 4 -5 months a year, never had problem with it.

flman
01-25-2013, 10:59 AM
I'm not surprised. As I said in another thread, I think that there are advantages to starting with warm(er) oil from an oil pan heater, but it should not be necessary to need any heater for low temperatures until it gets extremely low. What's extremely low?? Based upon my limited experience, given a decent engine, edit: good battery, good glow plugs, proper viscosity oil, and good fuel you're OK to at least -10F for reliable starting. :2cents: vic

I guess I am a member of the "My Sprinter block heater has failed club"

I do have a shop I can put it in, but right now my NCV3 is just setting in there like a garage queen hibernating for the winter, so she does not get any road salt on her. She will have to just sit outside if the temps get to cold for the T1N to start. But I never really had to plug in an electronic diesel for starting purpose, more of a warmth thing.