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nugget
01-05-2013, 12:37 PM
I just changed oil and the fuel filter on my 2012 2500 extended . There are two different fuel filters for 2012 which are VIN sensitive. I happen to be the unlucky owner of the van that requires the filter that has the water separater built into the filter which costs $157.00. My question is does anyone know of any outlet that is more reasonable than my local Freightliner dealer?

Aqua Puttana
01-05-2013, 12:58 PM
If it isn't listed in their catalog try talking to Steve at Europarts San Diego. vic

http://europarts-sd.com/

Ace in the hole
01-05-2013, 01:07 PM
Mercedes makes it very confusing to know what filter you need and they use multiple filters with different part numbers in the same model year so keep an eye on what you buy. I believe that all the current sprinters use a filter that has the water separator unit that goes into the top of it. I can't say for sure on your 2012 but I know that for 2011 there are at least two models of fuel filters. They are a Mann WK8016x or a Mann WK820/1, these also cross to Mahle numbers KL490D and KL723D. Most of these you can find for around $50-60. They say you need to compare it to the one you took out to know which one to use. I would think that one of those two are what you need but like I said- do some research.

I see there is also a model that comes with a non replaceable sensor unit, this may be what you have in which case they are pricey.

Aqua Puttana
01-05-2013, 01:26 PM
...
I see there is also a model that comes with a non replaceable sensor unit, this may be what you have in which case they are pricey.
:hmmm:

Not that anyone asked.

Warranty is always a concern. After that goes away....

Anybody know if conversion to the less expensive filter unit is possible? It might be worth looking into.

Alternatively install an in-line pre-filter with a pressure gauge on the outlet side before the OEM filter and change that one based upon pressure or on the suggested interval. A pre-filter should let the OEM filter last almost indefinitely. Just a couple thoughts. vic

jdcaples
01-05-2013, 01:48 PM
Vic, do you think that conversion to a cheaper filter is economically feasible?

I've observed that sensor input is expected by the engine controller module. Can the unit be reprogrammed?

Yes, however, reprogramming newer Sprinters control modules (post 2009) - exported from Germany to US and Canada - requires physical access to the controller (on a bench, in a shop, often far from the van's home). Daimler changed the programming specs after 2009 for our Sprinters and they aren't selling the specifications like they did to the principle programmer for the Sprinter Diagnostic Assistant, recently reborn as DAD for T1Ns and survives (barely) as Carsoft v14. Few service providers offer reprogramming services, which makes it an even more arduous endeavor. Am I off-base here?


To the concern at hand: I've also noticed that searching for the part number using google's shopping feature, yields a vast differential for the same part across an array of suppliers.

If I owned a 2012 US Sprinter and if I wanted to conserve cash on maintenance parts, I'd use website shopping tools like google's to find the best deal by supplying the part number to the search engine.


If I were committed to owning a 2012 van for a number of years - or at least a large number of service intervals - I'd stock up on genuine, OEM parts from a source with the best price.


-Jon

Aqua Puttana
01-05-2013, 02:05 PM
Vic, do you think that conversion to a cheaper filter is economically feasible?

I've observed that sensor input is expected by the engine controller module. Can the unit be reprogrammed?

Yes, however, reprogramming newer Sprinters control modules (post 2009) - exported from Germany to US and Canada - requires physical access to the controller (on a bench, in a shop, often far from the van's home). Daimler changed the programming specs after 2009 for our Sprinters and they aren't selling the specifications like they did to the principle programmer for the Sprinter Diagnostic Assistant, recently reborn as DAD for T1Ns and survives (barely) as Carsoft v14. Few service providers offer reprogramming services, which makes it an even more arduous endeavor. Am I off-base here?

...

-Jon
Jon,
Good points. I can't answer those questions. Certainly programming would increase cost and effort necessary. It may just be a matter of the style filter that was available during the production run. The sensing design may be the same? In a production setting these type selections are not always based upon design science. Why do Sprinters have different brand front brakes within the same production year? :idunno::idunno:

The pre-filter wouldn't be very expensive and would be relatively straight-forward. Mounting space could be a problem. On a pressure system the pre-filter could be locted most anywhere.

Stockpiling $100+ price range filters wouldn't be an option for me.

Just some suggestions. Nobody needs to take them seriously. vic

jdcaples
01-06-2013, 01:33 AM
I did the pre-filter thing. I wrote about it here:

http://sprinter-source.com/forum/showthread.php?t=17506

It was hard to find a filter that was both below the factory 5 micron specification which could also withstand the pressure from the lift pump in the tank.

Most of the filters I looked at 4 or 5 years ago were rated for 30psi which would fail catastrophically in a US/Canadian 2007+ Sprinter.

Anyway, it's viable, even with the 2012's DEF system in the way. It will take some creative bracket fabrication and plumbing, but it's doable.

-Jon

nugget
01-06-2013, 11:28 AM
Thanks for all the input. Owning a Sprinter is just a bit more expensive which I knew when I purchased the van. I will just carry a extra filter with tools and try to push out the mileage to 20,000 then 30,000 to maximize the cost. My driving is almost all road miles and I always try to fill at stations that have high volume sales in hopes of getting better fuel.

jdcaples
01-06-2013, 02:08 PM
People talk about extending the duty cycle of the factory filter all the time.

Generally, it's not recommended because a couple of Sprinter mechanics have cleaned up the mess created by owners being penny-smart but dollar foolish. The cost of injectors and or the high pressure fuel pump is a jaw-dropping figure.

No one's talked about actually measuring the filter's pressure differential to determine the contamination level. I think that's better than just running the filter longer and hoping for the best. It's a one time cost to get a gauge, a T-fitting to take the measurement during the 10,000 mile service intervals. At least an owner would know if the filter's operating within spec.

So, what's the pressure differential?

The service manual for the OM642.993 (2007-2009) describes the pressure differential between the inlet and outlet of the fuel filter as follows:

DESCRIPTION

The fuel filter was designed for improved high altitude operation and for better re-start after the fuel tank has been completely emptied. The water drain plug and water in fuel (WIF) sensor are located on the top of the filter. Water is drained by using the in-tank electric fuel pump to generate flow (attach a hose to the drain plug). The filter has a pressure differential of 200-300 mbar (2.9 psi.) when new. When dirty, the pressure differential rises to 800 mbar (11.6 psi.) .


2010-2011 Sprinters use a a similar engine, the OM642.898 and I think 2012+ use an OM642.896. I believe the pressure specifications are the same for all three US/Canadian 3.0L v6 diesel engines (642.993, .898 and .896).

-Jon

Aqua Puttana
01-06-2013, 02:28 PM
...
It was hard to find a filter that was both below the factory 5 micron specification which could also withstand the pressure from the lift pump in the tank.
My approach would be to just use a coarse filter if finer filters are hard to locate. A coarse filter will also stop the 5 micron particles, just not as many. One like you used has the potential to extend your OEM filter indefinitely. I wonder what the useful life of the filter media is? If that begins to deteriorate and pieces come off then it may turn against what it is designed to do.

Most of the filters I looked at 4 or 5 years ago were rated for 30psi which would fail catastrophically in a US/Canadian 2007+ Sprinter.
...
-Jon
That is very good information for those who might not consider it. Were I to do any modifications I would definitely include a gauge or gauges in the installaion.



...My driving is almost all road miles and I always try to fill at stations that have high volume sales in hopes of getting better fuel.
I've pushed my T1N interval to 40,000 miles without issues using similar methods. :shhh:

vic

Ace in the hole
01-06-2013, 05:48 PM
Interesting conversation. I would probably lean toward the aftermarket per filter option before going to trying to change to a cheaper oem replacement just because of not knowing what all the ecu is monitoring on the stock unit. If I knew what exactly the ecu was looking for and could match that to a replacement that was cheaper I would go that route but it would take a man with better knowledge of the stock set up to convince me it was a viable alternative. With a good pre filter set up you could theoretically extend the stock unit indefinitely.

Road Jager
01-06-2013, 09:13 PM
Thanks for all the input. Owning a Sprinter is just a bit more expensive which I knew when I purchased the van. I will just carry a extra filter with tools and try to push out the mileage to 20,000 then 30,000 to maximize the cost. My driving is almost all road miles and I always try to fill at stations that have high volume sales in hopes of getting better fuel.

M/Benz suggests F/F replacement at 10,000 mile intervals. This should be followed. If you think the filter is costly, price the high pressure fuel pump, injectors, a tow bill and labor. A good fuel additive such as Power Service products, is well worth the proactive preventative maintenance that it costs. What is your time worth sitting on the side of the road trying to repair your Sprinter or having your vehicle out of service?
Road Jager

Aqua Puttana
01-06-2013, 11:08 PM
M/Benz suggests F/F replacement at 10,000 mile intervals. This should be followed. If you think the filter is costly, price the high pressure fuel pump, injectors, a tow bill and labor. A good fuel additive such as Power Service products, is well worth the proactive preventative maintenance that it costs. What is your time worth sitting on the side of the road trying to repair your Sprinter or having your vehicle out of service?
Road Jager
It's funny how we quote the Mercedes recommendations when we agree, and kinda ignore them when we don't.

Mother Mercedes does recommend a 10,000 mile fuel filter change interval, which I feel is very, very conservative.

Mother Mercedes also recommends against using any fuel additives that aren't on their exclusive list. Power Service isn't on the list. I use it too. I think it helps.


:cheers:vic

jdcaples
01-07-2013, 08:23 PM
Using a coarse filter is a fine nice idea as long as you don't starve the engine of fuel. What's the throughput of the factory filter? My OM642.993 can consume a little less than 34 liters per hour for two or three seconds (less than five) before dropping back in to the 20s and then the teens. Can a coarse filter deliver that at 50 psi or more? I don't know. I never checked. If you're gonna use one, you should check though.

How did I measure the 34 liters per hour? Chrysler's StarMOBILE (notice how I didn't just say "star" so we don't get StarMOBILE and MB Star Diagnosis System confused?).

StarMOBILE won't work on 2010+ Sprinters. Only MB SDS can read the fuel consumption in liters per hour on all Sprinters unless that scanguage gizmo can do that.... not sure.

Anyway.... the point is you have to design a fuel polishing system so it's transparent to the engine controller or you're asking for trouble... it needs to deliver the expected amount of fuel on time, or you might starve the engine of fuel, freak out the engine control module and then you're risking all kinds of trouble codes and "limp" aka "creep" aka "reduced power" symptoms. Any additional plumbing should have a larger ID than the factory supply lines.

Also remember that the factory filter's rated at 5 microns. You can't see 5 microns. Humans can't see 10 micron wide objects w/o a microscope. So I figure - for right or wrong - Daimler's filter choice is to protect the OM642 family of high pressure fuel pumps and the injectors from objects so small you can't see 'em.


Aside from my liver and my kidneys, I think my Sprinter's fuel filters are the most conservative fluid filters I own.



-Jon