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View Full Version : Duely vs. single wheel


ixlplix
12-27-2011, 05:12 PM
the engine is the same but the chassis is built to handle more weight in the duel wheel version. can the engine perform just as well with the extra weight .

mean_in_green
12-27-2011, 08:06 PM
Perhaps not equally, as one is heavier than the other to begin with. Depends where you are too as not all the engines are available in all markets.

brianmcgaha
12-28-2011, 11:10 PM
Iam looking for diagrams showing the hardware differences between the suspension and rearends of T1N 2500 vs 3500 and NCV3 2500 vs 3500.
Can anyone point to these exploded diagrams specifically?

I have tried to DL the T1N manual (in hopes of finding this information) a few times in the past year from this thread http://sprinter-source.com/forum/showthread.php?t=8226&page=5 with no luck.

Maybe this will help the OP.

Doug
12-30-2011, 01:57 AM
The main difference is the frame has a jog in it to accommodate the dual wheels. You would have to rebuild the whole rear frame to change over from one to the other. The 2 files show the difference between 2500 and 3500 for the frame and hangers of a T1N.

Doug
04 Topless 140 with a jog in the the frame.
5700# of brick on the back today

Chandlerazman
12-30-2011, 02:20 AM
One main point I can recommend on the dually is the handling. That thing can corner surprisingly well. It's my sports van as I see it and with that said, I have no fears of throwing in the turns.

brianmcgaha
12-30-2011, 02:52 AM
Are the differentials in the T1N the same 2500 vs 3500? Just 3500 axles are shorter to accomodate the duals?
What about NCV3? Same diff?

atulin
12-30-2011, 05:40 AM
One main point I can recommend on the dually is the handling. That thing can corner surprisingly well. It's my sports van as I see it and with that said, I have no fears of throwing in the turns.

I second that. The handling on the dually is really surprising. Especially to the cars you come up behind in corners :thumbup:

rb3232
01-07-2012, 11:51 PM
I have taken the same tight turning on/off ramps for the last 20 years as fast as I can. I can take them at least 10mph faster and more comfortably in my NCV3 3500 than my old 2000 Camaro. (I know the Camaro isn't a true sports car, but it was pretty good for the $) I didn't know this can be attributed to the dually.

Niceguy12
12-18-2014, 10:31 PM
I wonder if I need the dual tire sprinter
I am planning on using it for a camper conversion but don't plan on putting a lot of stuff in it

I don't care about being able to take corners as much as I like good gas mileage and I understand the dual tire sprinter gets a little worse mileage

and there is the added expense of those extra tires

smiller
12-18-2014, 11:20 PM
Just a matter of the weight you need to carry. You need to tally up the weight of the conversion components, fresh and wastewater, house batteries and/or generator, cargo, and all vehicle occupants. A 2500 will do fine for a very basic conversion but if you are looking at the whole enchilada then you will likely need (or eventually wish you had) a 3500.

Niceguy12
12-18-2014, 11:27 PM
I am guessing duel tires are better in the snow too

smiller
12-18-2014, 11:29 PM
Empty duallies are typically worse in the snow and poor-traction conditions due to less weight on each tire, so less traction. This gets offset in a heavy-loaded vehicle though.

Niceguy12
12-18-2014, 11:48 PM
How much worse is the mileage?
I read 1 to 2 miles per gallon worse than the single wheeled

smiller
12-18-2014, 11:57 PM
How much worse is the mileage?
I read 1 to 2 miles per gallon worse than the single wheeled
That's probably about right, but it varies due to reasons other than just the two additional wheels. For instance 3500s tend to be loaded more heavily and have a lower rear end ratio, etc., all of which impact mileage so any mileage difference is probably more related to the mode of use than simply the number of tires. But the bottom line is if you need the weight capacity then you need it, and if so then you have to pay to play.

jdcaples
12-19-2014, 12:07 AM
The heavier hardware to support the carrying capacity of a 3500 also impacts fuel economy.

-Jon

sailquik
12-19-2014, 12:12 AM
Niceguy12,
Under normal use, the dual rear wheel Sprinters actually get significantly better tire mileage (typically 80-100 k +) than the single rear wheel
Sprinters.
So, the cost may be a wash due to better overall tire mileage with the duals.
As far as axle ratio's yes, the dual rear wheel (DRW) most often have the 4.182 ratio, but the single rear wheel Sprinters with the 3.923 and 3.727 only get a little better mileage if they are lightly loaded and are driven in a manner that does not involve lugging along @ < 2400 RPM very much.
Roger

rb3232
12-19-2014, 02:21 AM
Empty duallies are typically worse in the snow and poor-traction conditions due to less weight on each tire, so less traction. This gets offset in a heavy-loaded vehicle though.

I think I get better traction in snow with four tires on the rear axel than two. I don't know for sure but my two dually 3500 ncv3's have been way better in the snow than the two T1N 2500's I had...

If I ever order new I will get the 3500.

kitesurfer
12-19-2014, 02:44 PM
and there is the added expense of those extra tires

Offset by the fact that you don't change your tyres so often just so long as you keep rotating them as the fronts seem to wear out first. I have a duely motorhome I have had the same set of tyres now for 6 years and 105,000 miles.

KS

thlevy48
12-19-2014, 07:02 PM
The dually is also much more stable in a crosswind. Drowe across Kansas a couple of years ago with a 50 mph crosswind. Did not feel it in the van but my arms and shoulders knew it that night.

Also think about the finished GVW of you conversion. On the road, mine weighs between 9,000 and 9,300 #. To heavy for a 2500! I still get 18-22 mpg depending on the roads. You just need to keep your foot out of it. Wind resistance will kill your mpg above 70 mph.