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fdl
08-20-2007, 02:12 AM
Is anyone using a bypass oil filter? If so how/where did you install?

sikwan
08-20-2007, 03:28 AM
Member Suba is using one on his T1N.

jdcaples
08-20-2007, 06:56 AM
Is anyone using a bypass oil filter? If so how/where did you install?


I don't have my NCV3 yet. I have been researching the situation because I plan to install a bypass oil filter for motor oil and transmission fluid. I have a few promising notions.

The biggest barrier: there's no pressured stream source like an oil cooler hose.

For a by-pass filter installation, what's needed is a source of pressured oil. There are no oil hoses and the oil (level, temperature, whatever) sending unit is not a threaded component.

Option 1) Mercedes has a pressure-test oil filter cap. MB Part/Tool number 642 589 00 91 00.

Unlike the Transmission Fluid Level Measuring "Tool," this tool can function permanently in place, according to a Mercedes dealership shop foreman, somewhere in New Jersey.

This individual told me that the oil cooler is mounted under the turbo charger on the OM642.

His information contradicts the parts catalog, page 146, found in the Important (NCV3) OEM Information (http://sprinter-source.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1281) of this forum. I don’t really know anything until I get my hands on the vehicle.

I may pick up one of these pressure test tools and install that as a permanent fixture and, instead of a gauge, feed a filter with it... or maybe I’ll punch a hole in the oil filter cap. Neither is my preference, however. The cap has to twist to release the full-flow filter for replacement. I prefer stationary fittings, ones that stay put and don't spin.

Option 2) I did purchase the base plate (for lack of a better term) that is part of the oil filter assembly. Again, see the parts catalog. This assembly bolts to the front of the engine on the driver's side (I think). This plate has integrated channels to force oil into the filter and - presumably - out to the oil cooler or the block.

In looking at the oil filter assembly, I may elect to punch a hole in one of the channels, tap it with nominal pipe thread compatible with any air-tool, brass fitting.

I will at least feed a bypass filter with that opening (restricted with an orifice drilled out to 1/16th of an inch to keep from momentarily starving the engine) and perhaps an oil cooler if I'm not happy with the nominal temperature of the oil. I think 165 degrees F is what's required to boil off any diesel fuel contamination, but I forget at the moment.

All this is conjecture until I actually have a vehicle. I do have a hunk of paper with a VIN that checks out to a Freightliner Cargo Van, 2500... but so far, that's all I have....

If you have any other ideas, I'd love to read about 'em in the NCV3 Power Train area (http://sprinter-source.com/forum/forumdisplay.php?f=36).

-Jon

PLUMMER
08-20-2007, 12:37 PM
I considered this also, as I ran the amsoil versions before. But after lots of research I feel for my situation a 2nd oil filter wont be necessary unless I want to extent drain intervals. Been there done that too with amsoil. Never again. Now in the case of fuel filters I am considereing a way to filter down to .5 microns without restricting fuel flow.

Suba
08-23-2007, 09:03 PM
This is what I did.

jdcaples
08-27-2007, 04:07 PM
This is what I did. 3352

3353

Suba, that's an elegant installation. Thanks for posting the pictures!

-Jon

Altered Sprinter
08-27-2007, 10:36 PM
Suba, come out of the wood work:smilewink: and show us how you did it?? I'd be interested as we did this as a dual system but drilled into the block. yours is different. Come on be a sport Please.
Richard

jdcaples
08-27-2007, 11:12 PM
Suba, that's an elegant installation. Thanks for posting the pictures!

-Jon

I didn't save a copy of the pictures.

It looked like he drilled a hole into the oil filter cap, placed a 90 degree brass fitting into it. From there it went into something that looked like an oil cooler line. Between the brass fitting and the oil cooler-looking line, there was some teflon tape on the outside threads of 90.

That line went into the inlet of the bypass filter - a Franz 3 stacker, mounted on the frame rail under the vehicle.

Filtered oil left the bypass filter housing's directly back into the oil pan, a few inches from the oil pan.

I think...

Interesting points:

The hole he made in the oil pan was very close to the bottom of the pan. Typical guidance is to place the hole a few inches above the bottom of the pan. I doubt it matters that much in this application.

I'm curious why he elected to not place the filter housing a little higher than the oil pain ingress point. I have noticed that my current bypass filter drains really nicely if I crack it to let some air in. I don't even drip oil any more as I change the filter media. Then again, the camera angle and shape of its lens may have impacted the view enough to make my interpretation of the angles inaccurate.



-Jon

tegimr
09-03-2007, 07:30 AM
I didn't save a copy of the pictures.

It looked like he drilled a hole into the oil filter cap, placed a 90 degree brass fitting into it. From there it went into something that looked like an oil cooler line. Between the brass fitting and the oil cooler-looking line, there was some teflon tape on the outside threads of 90.

That line went into the inlet of the bypass filter - a Franz 3 stacker, mounted on the frame rail under the vehicle.

Filtered oil left the bypass filter housing's directly back into the oil pan, a few inches from the oil pan.

I think...

Interesting points:

The hole he made in the oil pan was very close to the bottom of the pan. Typical guidance is to place the hole a few inches above the bottom of the pan. I doubt it matters that much in this application.

I'm curious why he elected to not place the filter housing a little higher than the oil pain ingress point. I have noticed that my current bypass filter drains really nicely if I crack it to let some air in. I don't even drip oil any more as I change the filter media. Then again, the camera angle and shape of its lens may have impacted the view enough to make my interpretation of the angles inaccurate.



-Jon

Suba purchased a new oil drain plug and installed return oil into the drain plug in the beginning.

Here's an update on my Frantz bypass filter. I've successfully installed my 3 stacker. . . .
I've got the bypass unit mounted just forward of the oil pan. This gave me an 8" line to the pan, and a 30" line to the oil cap. In only 30 miles, my oil is already super clean. This is a result of filtering through 3 rolls of toilet paper at once, and the short oil lines. I did add a lot of new oil, but my dipstick showed pretty black oil before I added the new. Behold...the power of toilet paper ! I'm going to offer to make the oil cap unit for anyone wanting to buy one. It's a relatively time consuming process. You would get a new oil cap with a new filter, and either a 1/8 or 1/4 fitting tapped into it and reinforced with a high temp epoxy. I can't see how this could ever fail. You would retain your old cap if you ever wanted to reinstall it. You may not want an oil bypass unit on your Sprinter, but you may want a oil pressure or oil temp gauge. The modified cap would work for all three. Modifying the cap isn't rocket science, but it does take thought, and I have a good working prototype. I would have to charge $79.00 for a new modified cap and filter. I think it's worth the money. I would also make the new drain plug assembly for anyone wanting to have a bypass and return the oil to the pan through the drain plug. I feel it's a great way to return the oil, and it's not a permanent modification, just like the oil cap. . . .
That's all guys. Happy motoring.

Tim

(clock is ticking on the 'edit' clock. :lol:

mean_in_green
09-03-2007, 07:42 AM
Are you blokes living somewhere especially hot?

May I ask if you would care to explain your reasoning for wanting additional filtering please?

jdcaples
09-03-2007, 08:07 AM
Are you blokes living somewhere especially hot?

May I ask if you would care to explain your reasoning for wanting additional filtering please?

While I can't speak for anyone other than myself, I'll give it a go:

Soot is exceptionally abrasive.

While I can't speak from personal experience about other fuels on the face of the globe, in the States, soot contamination from diesel combustion is significant and engine oil collects soot, runs it across bearings, camshaft, valve lifting mechanics and everything else the oil touches.

Diesel engines are legendary for durability - especially in comparision to their petrol counterparts - however, anything that holds the promise of capturing soot resulting from the combustion process appears to promote longevity.

By-pass filtration's installation are two fold:

1) by-pass filters - if cloggled - do not interrupt the path of oil to the engine
2) by virtue of their low-flow position in the circuit (a clogged by-pass filter is functionally part of the oil passage wall), a by-pass filter can filter more slowly, and much more effectively than an in-path filter. Some media can filter down to 2 microns vs 45 microns or greater for a full flow filter.

Two major benefits of the implementation:

1) The reserve of oil becomes irreversably contaminated much more slowly because particles too small for the full-flow filter to capture are pulled aside and trapped in the by-pass filter medium. This retards engine wear.
2) In theory, the oil will have to undergo a wholesale swap fewer times during the engine life, benefiting the environment

Further, and this speaks to preserving the diesel particulate filter, if soot can be sequestered in the by-pass filter, then it can not be liberated from the oil during the combustion process and therefore never gets caught in the DPF... that's my personal theory... I've no evidence to suggest that this anything other than a notion.

-Jon

mean_in_green
09-03-2007, 09:38 PM
I accept all of that in principle Jon, but part of me can't help thinking about all the sprinters I know of that have lasted extraordinarily well without a by-pass filter.

You've got me thinking about it in the meantime though.

Simon

Altered Sprinter
09-03-2007, 11:23 PM
Simon where the thread originally began, was a member now gone! 'called suba.'
The point was in part old technology, with filters and a lower more efficient micron rating down to less than eight microns, He had a valid point as to many of the 5 cylinder engines failing and no warranty with oil sludge, this was not directed towards the sprinter, as such. But with other 5 cylinder engines with in the now defunct DCX group of Chrysler engines. When you stop and think of the simplicity of the Sprinters oil filter! it's still in the 30 micron range? as it was thirty years ago, Again thinking of the advancement of technology with Sprinter engines , the filter seems to have been overlooked! we have continuous environmental impact regulations for emissions , yet there are no requirements towards improved filtration systems for the Sprinters. It can be done alternative filters down to one micron are available but not off the shelf for the famous Sprinter:idunno: Thinking at the last moment before self destruct! As the electronics system says Blimp
3484


Richard

PLUMMER
09-06-2007, 03:40 AM
Are you blokes living somewhere especially hot?

May I ask if you would care to explain your reasoning for wanting additional filtering please?

I am thinking same thing, if good fuel and not lots of dust or contaminates why more filter ???? I mean the thing is small enuff as it is for a reason....yes???

Why doesn't someone send in a sample to amsoil and see whats in your oil first, to even be able to determine its necessity. The oil tests come back with very detailed info, about every element and type of metal floating around in the oil. Can tell you if a ring is going or main bearings just from the type of metal they find in the test sample, or if there is high level of fuel contamination,soot and such.

jdcaples
09-06-2007, 05:40 AM
I am thinking same thing, if good fuel and not lots of dust or contaminates why more filter ???? I mean the thing is small enuff as it is for a reason....yes???

Why doesn't someone send in a sample to amsoil and see whats in your oil first, to even be able to determine its necessity. The oil tests come back with very detailed info, about every element and type of metal floating around in the oil.

Can tell you if a ring is going or main bearings just from the type of metal they find in the test sample, or if there is high level of fuel contamination,soot and such.

Actually, used oil analysts say just that: they base a lot of conclusions on the test results, the amount and type of particles that are in a sample, what indicates bearing wear, ring wear etc, etc.

For me, I'm just going to do it because it feels like the right thing for me to do. Yeah, it's a little more work but I've observed that regular maintenance exercises - "strictly" necessary or "a waste" - cause me to look around notice changes. I'm ok with it, but it certainly might not be the right choice for everyone.

I don't think it'll do any damage, but I also don't feel like turning it into a controlled(ish) experiment staring me.

-Jon

PS: polished fluids, to me, are only part of the longevity hopes. Fluid temperature control is also high on my list.